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“Spiritual But Not Religious”: Spirituality in America

Matthew S. Hedstrom
Author

University of Virginia
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2012
Date Published

Description:

What does “spiritual but not religious” mean, and why has it become such a pervasive self-description in contemporary America? This interdisciplinary course surveys spirituality in America, with a particular eye for the relationship between spirituality and formal religion, on the one hand, and secular modes of understanding the self, such as psychology, on the other. Along the way we’ll study everything from AA to yoga to Zen meditation, with stops in Christian rock, Beat poetry, Abstract Expressionist painting, spirit photography, the feminist movement, environmentalism, and recent film. The study of spirituality forces us to confront many of the central concerns of modern American life: psychology, self-help, and therapeutic culture; global religious and cultural encounters; gender and sexuality; and consumerism and mass culture. In the end, we’ll come to see spirituality in America as a complex intermingling of the great world religions, modern therapeutic psychology, the politics of movements for social change, and a crassly commercialized, billion-dollar culture industry. Is this the fate of religion in a modern, capitalist, globalized society?

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, American Studies, History

Religious Traditions: Buddhism, General Comparative Traditions, Hinduism, New Religious Movements, Protestant

Topics: Gender/Women/ Sexuality, He​alth/Death, Popular Culture/Media/Music/Sports, Science/Technology/Environment

Keywords: Consumerism, Counterculture

Advanced Topics in the Sociology of Religion

Wendy Cadge
Author

Brandeis University
Institution


Resource Type

2012
Date Published

Description:

This graduate level course introduces you to the tools and concepts central to the sociological study of religion in the United States. It is divided into three sections. In the first section, we discuss what the social scientific study of religion is by readings works by classic and neo-classic thinkers in light of several overviews of the field. The second section focuses on key issues important for anyone trying to understand religion in the United States. The final few weeks will focus on a few (of the many) topics you are interested in as a class. I will provide reading lists for the third section of the course shortly after the semester begins. Materials throughout the course are drawn from across theoretical and methodological approaches.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Graduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Sociology

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics:

Keywords: religion, graduate, race, secularism, religious institutions, congregations, individualism, pluralism

African American Religions

Julius Bailey
Author

University of Redlands
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2006
Date Published

Description:

This course offers an introduction to African American religions. The class moves chronologically, examining African religions in the Americas (Santeria, Candomble, and Vodou), cultural continuities between African and African-American religions, slave religion, and the development of independent African American churches. We will examine the rise of African American new religious movements such as Father Divine and the Nation of Islam, and the religious dimensions of the Civil Rights Movement. Moving through African-American religious history, we will consider topics such as slave resistance, gender and race, and emigration to Africa.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions, Islam, New Religious Movements, Other Traditions, Protestant

Topics: Family/Children/Reproduction, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords:

African American Religious History

Alison Collis Greene
Author

Mississippi State University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

African American Religious History is a new upper-level course in the History Department.  This course provides an introduction to African American religious history from the colonial period to the present. The course textbook provides a broad overview of African American religious history, which provides a common base of knowledge for our discussions. The additional course readings, lectures, documentary viewings, and class discussion provide an opportunity to examine particular moments or movements in more depth. By the end of the course, students should have both a general knowledge of African American religious history and a more comprehensive knowledge of a few particularly rich moments and themes in that history.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, History

Religious Traditions: Islam, Other Christianities, Other Traditions, Protestant

Topics: Class/Power, Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Politics/Law/Government, Popular Culture/Media/Music/Sports, Race/Ethnicity, Region/Urban/Rural

Keywords:

American Catholic History

Michael Pasquier
Author

Louisiana State University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2012
Date Published

Description:

This course provides an introduction to the historical experiences of Catholics in North America from the colonial period to the present. This course is not only an institutional history of the American Catholic Church, but also a study of popular manifestations of Catholicism which tries to uncover the diverse experiences of American Catholics in different places and times throughout the history of the United States. We will use a variety of primary and secondary sources to achieve these goals, including traditional monographs, novels, memoirs, films, papal documents, correspondences, essays, speeches, poetry, political writings, sermons, advertisements, liturgies, and works of art. Over the course of the semester we will learn about the major developments, persons, institutions, and ideas that shaped the experiences of Catholics at different moments in American history. We will also learn how to listen to and understand the voices of people from the past and the present, perspectives that are embedded in historical artifacts and available to us in the person of Catholic adherents today.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, History

Religious Traditions: Catholic

Topics: Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Immigration/Refugees, Politics/Law/Government, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords:

American Christianities

Emily Clark
Author

Gonzaga University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2017
Date Published

Description:

Americans frequently debate on whether or not this is a Christian nation. Those same Americans have different understandings of what a “Christian nation” is. In America, it seems there is no one way to be Christian. From initial encounters and exchanges between European colonists and Native Americans to the serpent-handling churches in rural Appalachia, we will build a thematic and chronological framework for understanding the diversity of Christianities in American history and culture. Christianity has been a dominant force in American history, and it has been a very diverse force. During the course, we will investigate the powerful social, cultural, political, and intellectual role Christianity plays in our nation’s past.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, American Studies

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics: Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Politics/Law/Government, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords:

American Christianity

Diana Butler Bass
Author

Rhodes College
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

1996
Date Published

Description:

Course Goals and Objectives: 1.) Present a broad survey of the history of Christianity in the United States. 2.) Acquaint students with the contributions of the Christian tradition to American culture and the effects of American culture on Christian faith and practice. 3.) Assess the role and importance of traditionally marginalized peoples and religious traditions in American Christianity. 4.) Increase analytical and critical skills with primary and secondary sources and the ability to express those skills verbally and in writing. 5.) Understand the relevance of historical debates regarding God, nature and society to current religious, social and political issues.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, History

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics: Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords:

American Civil Religion

Julia M. Speller
Author

Chicago Theological Seminary
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

1999
Date Published

Description:

This course will examine the origins, structures and parameters of American Civil Religion and discuss its presence in and influence on American society and American religion. This study will focus on the speeches, addresses, sermons and essays of Benjamin Franklin, Lucretia Mott, Abraham Lincoln, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Frederick Douglass as they each responded to the issues of authority, freedom, justice and social transformation, and in so doing, reveals important aspects of this phenomenon on the issues of their time.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Seminary

Class Type: Graduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, American Studies, History

Interdisciplinary

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions, Protestant

Topics: Class/Power, Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Politics/Law/Government, Race/Ethnicity, Nationalism/War/Civil Religion

Keywords:

American Evangelicalism

Omri Elisha
Author

Queens College, City University of New York
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

Evangelical Christianity is among the most powerful religious movements in the world today. Driven by the mandate to “bring new souls to Christ,” as well as the demands of born-again faith and biblical orthodoxy, evangelicals along with televangelists, revivalists, and missionaries, pursue a wide array of social, cultural, and even commercial enterprises, inspiring all manner of innovation, indoctrination, and controversy. This course takes a serious look at evangelicalism from an anthropological perspective. Covering topics such as revivalism, Biblicism, contemporary Christian media, missionization, and gender ideology, we will consider multiple dimensions of evangelicalism as lived religion, an explore its active role in shaping many of the key cultural movements, debates, and historical transformations that have defined secular modernity, from confessional notions of self and society to conflicts over religion and science and the separation of church and state. Our aim will be neither to evaluate nor justify evangelical Christianity but rather to better understand the depth and complexity of its global influence in the contemporary moment.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Anthropology, English

Religious Traditions: Protestant

Topics: Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Popular Culture/Media/Music/Sports

Keywords: thematic

American Gospels: Religion and American Literature

Danielle B. Sigler
Author

Austin College
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2004
Date Published

Description:

Traditionally, religion and American literature course shave examined expressions of religious faith and practice in American fiction using American religious history as an organizational tool. This course recognizes that the relationship between American literature and religion is complex and not merely representational. Thus, we will examine a variety of works that typify four different ways American writers have combined art and religion: rewriting sacred texts, writing works of fiction and non-fiction that have inspired new religions and new religious movements, writing fiction that examines issue of faith and the supernatural, and finally critiquing American religion through fiction.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, American Studies, English

Religious Traditions: New Religious Movements, Protestant

Mormonism

Topics: Popular Culture/Media/Music/Sports, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars

Keywords: satire

American Indian Religions

Sarah Dees
Author

Iowa State University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2019
Date Published

Description:

The purpose of this course is to teach students about histories, sources, ways of knowing, politics, and ethical considerations that are valuable when seeking to understand Native American religious traditions. The course explores historical and contemporary Native traditions in what is today the United States. We will draw on theories from Religious Studies and Indigenous Studies, and utilize a range of methods, including historical, anthropological, and cultural studies approaches. Lectures, readings, discussions, and assignments will help to illuminate features of Native American traditions and situate them within important historical and political contexts. The course covers Native North American religious diversity, history, and contemporary practices. We will consider a number of issues: ethics, politics, practice, popular culture, self-determination, cultural appropriation, land rights, relationality, and environmentalism. We will both try to gain a big-picture look at themes and issues that affect many practitioners while examining case studies from specific Native nations.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course, Seminar

Discipline: Religious Studies, Other

American Indian Studies, Indigenous Studies

Religious Traditions: Indigenous

Topics: Empire/Foreign Policy/Globalism, Politics/Law/Government, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords:

American Jewish History and Culture

Lila Corwin Berman
Author

Pennsylvania State University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2006
Date Published

Description:

As one of the earliest non-Christian immigrant populations, American Jews have struggled to explain how they could nonetheless fit into American cultural, political and social life. At the same time, many Jews have been concerned with their own survival as a distinctive group, unwilling to cede those practices, behaviors or traits that designate them as a people apart from other Americans. The student of American-Jewish history must be attuned to the multiple ways that Jewishness has been defined: as a race, a religion, a nationality, and an ethnicity. In this course, far from choosing just one of these designations, we will explore Jewish life from many different angles. Topics to be considered include religious reform, immigrant experience, political activism, popular culture, and struggles over community authority and membership.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, American Studies, History

Jewish Studies

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics: Family/Children/Reproduction, Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Immigration/Refugees, Popular Culture/Media/Music/Sports, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords:

American Preaching: Word, Performance, and Media

M. Cooper Harriss
Author

Indiana University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2017
Date Published

Description:

A provocation: There is no more significant historical influence on the development of American language and literature, political oratory, musical/entertainment style, and
the refinement of media and technology—all of which is to say “American culture”— than preachers and their preaching. This course begins with a brief historical overview of the diversity of American preaching and some primary cultural and theoretical concerns before tracing its contributions to presumably “secular” culture considered in three categories: word (literature, rhetoric, and authority), performance (music, oratory, symbolic action, embodiment, affect), and media (pamphlets, radio, television, Internet, and other technologies). In the process we’ll consider religious dimensions of cultural production, questions of authority and identity, phenomenologies of charisma and emotion, and the critical possibilities for theology, homiletics, and other confessional “data” within the study of religion and culture.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course, Graduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, American Studies

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions, Protestant

Topics: Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Popular Culture/Media/Music/Sports, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords: religious leaders

American Religion

Rachel Wheeler
Author

Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2004
Date Published

Description:

A consideration of American religion, with particular emphasis on the development of religious diversity and religious freedom in the context of the American social,political, and economic experience. Special attention will be directed to changes in Roman Catholicism and Judaism as well as to alterations in the nature of American Protestantism.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies

Religious Traditions: Buddhism, Catholic, General Comparative Traditions, Hinduism, Indigenous, Islam, Judaism, New Religious Movements, Protestant

Topics: Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Popular Culture/Media/Music/Sports, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Race/Ethnicity, Nationalism/War/Civil Religion

Keywords:

American Religion & Refugees

Cara Burnidge
Author

University of Northern Iowa
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2017
Date Published

Description:

This course is a semester-long examination of religion and refugees in American history and culture. We will study what Americans mean—and have meant—when they talk about “religion,” “refugees,” and even “America”; we will examine what it means to belong to a nation as a citizen and what it means to be stateless; we will think historically and critically about nationalism, religion, and American culture; and we will reflect upon the relationships between and among all of these issues and their influence in our lives and American life today. In doing so, we will dwell upon the big questions central to religious and national identity: who belongs and who does not? Who has—or had—the authority to decide who belongs? How is that belonging enforced? What, if anything, unites “us” as an “us”? How do we know who is with “us” and who is not? As we think about these questions, we will see in more ways than one how this issue hits close to home.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, American Studies

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Empire/Foreign Policy/Globalism, Immigration/Refugees, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords: service learning

American Religion and Popular Culture in Theoretical Perspective

Sarah McFarland Taylor
Author

Northwestern University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2005
Date Published

Description:

This course provides an introduction to critical issues in and approaches to the study of religion and popular culture in America. We will self-reflexively consider what counts as “religion” in America, why, according what criteria, how definitions of religion change over time, and who has the authority to decide what falls into this category and what is excluded. In thinking through these questions, students will be asked to problematize “high” versus “low” culture distinctions, definitional oppositions between “the sacred” and “the profane,” and theoretical divisions between what is labeled as “religious” and “secular.” Examining a series of case studies drawn from film, television, popular music, performance art, and consumer culture, we explore the ways in which various forms of popular culture not explicitly recognized as being “religious” arguably take on religious dimensions. Where do we “see” or do not “see” religion, and what cultural and aesthetic factors (including iconographic and mythic representations of “America”) might shape these perceptions? Finally, we consider the export of American religion and popular culture to a global audience and the broader cultural ramifications of this phenomenon.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, American Studies, Anthropology

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions, Protestant

Topics: Business/Capitalism/Labor, He​alth/Death, Popular Culture/Media/Music/Sports, Race/Ethnicity, Science/Technology/Environment

Keywords:

American Religion Timelines

The Association of Religion Data Archives
Author


Institution

Other
Resource Type

2020
Date Published

Description:

These timelines allow instructors or students to interactively explore the most significant events and people in the history of American religion. The ARDA has 9 different timelines that place historical people, events, and contexts into conversation with each other.

Institution Type: K-12, Community College, Public College or University, Private College or University, Seminary

Class Type: Intro, Undergraduate Course, Graduate Course, Online, Hybrid, Seminar

Discipline: Religious Studies, American Studies, Anthropology, Area Studies, English, History, Philosophy, Political Science, Sociology, The Arts, Theology, Women's Studies, Other

Religious Traditions: Atheism/Agnosticism/Skepticism, Buddhism, Catholic, General Comparative Traditions, Hinduism, Indigenous, Islam, Judaism, New Religious Movements, Other Christianities, Other Traditions, Protestant

Topics: Business/Capitalism/Labor, Class/Power, Empire/Foreign Policy/Globalism, Family/Children/Reproduction, Gender/Women/ Sexuality, He​alth/Death, Immigration/Refugees, Politics/Law/Government, Popular Culture/Media/Music/Sports, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Race/Ethnicity, Region/Urban/Rural, Nationalism/War/Civil Religion, Science/Technology/Environment, Theology/Liturgy

Keywords: Timeline, American Religion

American Religions

Karin E. Gedge
Author

West Chester University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

1999
Date Published

Description:

Students in this course will acquire a broad overview of American religions from pre-European contact to the present with an emphasis on continuity and change over time, the remarkable variety and intensity of voluntary religion, and the sources of both conflict and consensus within and between various traditions. Since this is an advanced level history course, students will be required to demonstrate not only knowledge of course content but also skills in note-taking, inquiry, research, analysis, synthesis, and historiography. No prior knowledge of American religions or religious history is required. However, a basic working knowledge of American political and social history is an asset. This is a very demanding course, but students will have the opportunity to to acquire interesting, valuable knowledge and skills they will be able to use and apply beyond this course.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, American Studies, History

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Immigration/Refugees, Politics/Law/Government, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars

Keywords:

American Religions: In Search of the Promised Land

Tracy Neal Leavelle
Author

Creighton University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2006
Date Published

Description:

Religious communities and inspired individuals have through time discovered in America a seemingly ideal place to pursue their hopeful visions of purity, truth, and salvation. We will explore in this course the vibrant, contentious, and unfinished story of this ongoing search for the Promised Land. Together, we will examine the mutual influences of religion and American culture through studies of diverse religious communities with a particular emphasis on the intersection between religion and place. Specific issues for consideration include concepts of home and sacred space, religious dimensions of the conquest of America, religion and nature, the faith and practices of exile communities, and the influence of border culture on religion. Students will also participate in an ongoing project mapping Omaha religious landscapes. The project involves site visits, interviews, research in local historical material, and the use of advanced GPS and GIS technology.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies

Religious Traditions: Catholic, General Comparative Traditions, Indigenous

Topics: He​alth/Death, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Region/Urban/Rural, Science/Technology/Environment

Keywords:

American Religious Communities

Jennifer Graber
Author

College of Wooster
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2011
Date Published

Description:

Religious life in the United States has been marked by an ongoing tension: the power sought, and sometimes obtained, by majority religious groups and the religious pluralism that marks the population and is protected by law. In this class, we will explore this tension through a historically organized survey of majority and minority religious communities. We begin with the continent’s original pluralism in its hundreds of Native American religious traditions. We then move to powerful varieties of Protestant Christianity as they interacted with smaller groups, including colonial-era Jews, upstart Mormons, African-American Christians, newly immigrated Catholics, and more recently arrived immigrants who practice Hinduism and Islam.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies

Religious Traditions: Catholic, General Comparative Traditions, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics: Class/Power, Immigration/Refugees, Popular Culture/Media/Music/Sports, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Race/Ethnicity, Nationalism/War/Civil Religion

Keywords:

American Religious Folklife

Leonard Norman Primiano
Author

Cabrini College
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

1999
Date Published

Description:

Folklife Studies refers to the scholarly discipline which cultivates a sensibility and an appreciation for the culture of everyday life in complex societies. Religious folklife means specific cultural creations that express religious attitudes and beliefs. This course in American religious folklife will examine the history and culture of religion in America with specific reference to Christian and Christian-based systems, as well as believers’ religious artifacts, art, craft, architecture, belief, customs, habits, foodways, costume, narrative, dance, song and other cultural expressions.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, American Studies, Other

Folklore Studies

Religious Traditions: Catholic, General Comparative Traditions, Judaism, Other Traditions, Protestant

Vodou

Topics: Gender/Women/ Sexuality, He​alth/Death, Immigration/Refugees, Popular Culture/Media/Music/Sports, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords: material culture

American Religious History

Valarie Ziegler
Author

DePauw University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

1993
Date Published

Description:

American Religious History functions as a church history/Christian theology course. Though no semester course could possibly cover all or even most of the relevant issues, this course will introduce you to a variety of Christian expressions that have found life in America. We will begin with a study of Native American and European antecedents and proceed to an analysis of selected developments in American Christianity from the colonial period to the present. Two of the themes that will guide our study will be theoretical. The first is a theological question: what did the various groups and individuals believe? We will also ask a sociological question: in what ways did contact with the larger culture affect beliefs, practices, and self-identities? To what extent did religionists seek to shape their culture, and to what extent were they reflections of it? In addition to those theoretical questions, we will give also give attention to two enduring issues of debate: the relationship of men and women and the relationship of European Americans and African Americans within various Christian groups.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, American Studies, History, Theology

Religious Traditions: Protestant

Topics: Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Race/Ethnicity, Theology/Liturgy

Keywords: christian thought, the south

American Religious History

David Yoo
Author

Claremont McKenna College
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

1999
Date Published

Description:

American Religious History is a seminar that complements an introductory course on American religion. While the traditions, regions, and time periods covered are relatively broad, the seminar is less concerned about comprehensive coverage than it is about critically exploring how individuals, families, and communities have drawn upon religion to give meaning to self, group, and nation. Readings and discussion, fieldwork, and research/writing form the core of the course and together suggest the breadth and diversity of the religious history of the United States. The readings consist of historical monographs, articles, biography, fiction, and journalistic accounts. The class is taught as a history seminar and as such, there is an emphasis upon asking how the readings relate not only to the historiography of American religion, but also to the larger contexts of American history. Students are asked to critically explore why it is that so much of American history is written and taught as if religion did not exist. How would our understanding of central themes in our collective past be altered if we paid more attention to religion?

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, History

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars

Keywords: field work

American Religious History

Eugene McCarraher
Author

University of Delaware
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

1999
Date Published

Description:

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the history of religion in the United States. They will examine the relationship of of religious life to the cultural, social, economic, and political currents of American history, and consider how the history of religion shapes the way we should understand American history as a whole. Thus, they study the development of religious practices and beliefs in relation to proprietary and corporate capitalism, faith in technological progress, an increasingly pervasive market culture, changing gender conventions, racial and ethnic pluralism, and a political democracy structured, in part, by the separation of church and state. What, they ask, is “religion” in America? How have religious communities, practices, and ideas defined the course of American life?

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Catholic, General Comparative Traditions, Protestant

Topics: Business/Capitalism/Labor, Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Politics/Law/Government, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Race/Ethnicity, Science/Technology/Environment

Keywords: modernity,

American Religious History

Keith Harper
Author

Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

1999
Date Published

Description:

American Religious History will trace the development of American religion from the Colonial period to the present. We will not ignore important minority traditions such as Catholicism, or Judaism, but our focus will be on Protestants, especially evangelicals. Our operative assumption is that the religious groups and sub-groups that created American religious history have engaged in an ongoing search for order, stability, and legitimacy.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Seminary

Class Type: Graduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, History

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Judaism, Protestant

Topics: Immigration/Refugees, Politics/Law/Government, Nationalism/War/Civil Religion, Theology/Liturgy

Keywords:

American Religious History

Spencer Fluhman
Author

Brigham Young University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2009
Date Published

Description:

Student Learning Outcomes: Students who put forth the requisite time and effort (i.e., reading, writing, speaking, listening) will be able to (1) identify the historical origins, beliefs, and practices of major religious groups in the United States, (2) identify major events,trends, and transformations in the history of American religion, (3) critically examine historical documents related to the history of American religion, and (4) offer informed perspectives on the ways scholars have understood the history of American religion.

The Course: The course engages documents relating to religious people, practices, and ideas in the American past. Together, we tackle questions about religion in American life: how has religion shaped American culture? Been shaped by it? How has religious difference influenced social development in the United States? How have Americans understoodreligion’s place in the Republic?

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, History

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions, Protestant

Topics: Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Immigration/Refugees, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Race/Ethnicity, Region/Urban/Rural, Science/Technology/Environment

Keywords:

American Religious History

Edward J. Blum
Author

San Diego State University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2009
Date Published

Description:

This course begins with New World encounters as North and South Americans, Europeans, and Africans made religious sense of their experiences. It proceeds through the formation of the United States, the role of race, class, gender, and sexuality in the major shifts in America’s religious cultures, the coming, fighting, resolving of the Civil War, the rise of an industrial nation, the Great Depression, the Cold War, the Civil Rights movement, the rise of the new conservatism and beyond. We will pay particular attention to the role of religion in animating American politics, society, economics, and systems of oppression and resistance. We will focus on a variety of religious traditions, including Catholicism, Protestantism, Islam, indigenous faiths, spiritualism, and Judaism.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course, Graduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, History

Religious Traditions: Catholic, General Comparative Traditions, Indigenous, Islam, Judaism, New Religious Movements, Protestant

Topics: Business/Capitalism/Labor, Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Politics/Law/Government, Race/Ethnicity, Region/Urban/Rural, Nationalism/War/Civil Religion

Keywords:

American Religious History Syllabus

Shelby Balik
Author

Metropolitan State University of Denver
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2020
Date Published

Description:

This syllabus is for a survey course in American religious history. At my university, this course also fulfills the Multicultural General Studies requirement,  so it includes emphasis on indigenous spirituality and communities of color.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, History

Religious Traditions: Buddhism, Catholic, Hinduism, Indigenous, Islam, Judaism, New Religious Movements, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords: American religion, slavery, immigration, American Indians, Catholicism, Protestantism, Judaism, Latin American, Eastern religion

Art, Religion, and Material Culture in America

Douglas L. Winiarski
Author

University of Richmond
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2004
Date Published

Description:

“Art, Religion & Material Culture” introduces students to the diverse array of religious traditions that have flourished in America over the past four centuries through a focused examination of things: the “stuff” of religious life embodied in art, commercial and “folk” objects, buildings,and landscapes. We will learn to read the “visual culture” of American religion like a text,discovering along the way that a collection of neopagan ritual objects arranged carefully on a bedroom dresser can communicate as much information about the beliefs and practices of its owner as an introspective diary or letter.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, The Arts

Religious Traditions: Catholic, General Comparative Traditions, Indigenous, New Religious Movements, Other Traditions, Protestant

Topics: He​alth/Death, Popular Culture/Media/Music/Sports, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Nationalism/War/Civil Religion

Keywords: altars, sacred space

Atheism

Joseph Blankholm
Author

University of California, Santa Barbara
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2019
Date Published

Description:

What is atheism? Is it the absence of belief in God? Is it the absence of belief in the supernatural? Or is it a worldview and a way of life? Does atheism always oppose religion, or can the two co-exist or even embrace one another? This course traces the historical development of the set of ideas we now call atheism and takes account of its varieties in the world today. In addition to the history of atheism, we will look at related contemporary topics, such as religion-like secular communities, Islamophobia, and the possibility of an atheist spirituality. This course emphasizes reading and discussion, and students are strongly encouraged to complete the readings and to read with care.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, History, Philosophy

Religious Traditions: Atheism/Agnosticism/Skepticism

Topics:

Keywords:

Berman Jewish DataBank Learning Module-Exploring Jewish Identity

Harriet Hartman
Author

Rowan University
Institution

Assignment
Resource Type

2014
Date Published

Description:

Professor Harriet Hartman of Rowan University has created a Learning Module which is designed to introduce students and scholars to the analysis of Jewish survey data in a relatively easy-to-use format, utilizing some of the local Jewish community study and national Jewish survey data which are available at the Berman Jewish DataBank.The module is a self-learning, self-directed activity which focuses on exploring Jewish identity (religious identity and ethnic identity).   The module’s exercises invite thinking about Jewish identity and exploring ways in which Jewish identity is expressed.  The activities within the Learning Module are designed to help users learn how to read survey data to understand and interpret Jewish identity,  to help users explore some of the differences among Jewish persons with different denominational identifications (or none at all), and to compare findings in one Jewish community study to findings from other Jewish community studies.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Intro, Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Anthropology, Sociology

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Keywords: judaism, religion, comparative, module, self-learning, Jewish

Buddhist American History and Culture (Anthropology)

Jonathan Arbuckle
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Anthropology

Religious Traditions: Buddhism

Topics:

Keywords:

Buddhist American History and Culture (Art History)

Courtland Blade
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Buddhism

Topics:

Keywords:

Buddhist American History and Culture (Art History)

Amy Guess
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Buddhism

Topics:

Keywords:

Buddhist American History and Culture (Art History)

Joshua Phillippe
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2017
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Buddhism

Topics:

Keywords:

Buddhist American History and Culture (Composition)

Rachel Barrett-Knight
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: English

Religious Traditions: Buddhism

Topics:

Keywords:

Buddhist American History and Culture (History)

Audrey Jefferson
Author


Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2017
Date Published

Description:

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Buddhism

Topics:

Keywords:

Buddhist American History and Culture (History)

Joe: Skvarenina
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2017
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Buddhism

Topics:

Keywords:

Buddhist American History and Culture (Introduction to Ethics)

Barry LeBlanc
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2017
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Philosophy

Religious Traditions: Buddhism

Topics:

Keywords:

Buddhist American History and Culture (Philosophy)

Jeffrey Dodge
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2017
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Philosophy

Religious Traditions: Buddhism

Topics:

Keywords:

Buddhist American History and Culture (US History)

Douglas Hammerling
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Buddhism

Topics:

Keywords:

Buddhist American History and Culture (US History)

Allen Smith
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Buddhism

Topics:

Keywords:

Buddhist Traditions (American History)

Audrey Jefferson
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2017
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Buddhism

Topics:

Keywords:

Buddhist Traditions (American History)

Douglas Hammerling
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2017
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Buddhism

Topics:

Keywords:

Buddhist Traditions (Anthropology)

Jonathan Arbuckle
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2017
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Anthropology

Religious Traditions: Buddhism

Topics:

Keywords:

Buddhist Traditions (Art Appreciation)

Joanna Wos
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2017
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Buddhism

Topics:

Keywords:

Buddhist Traditions (Art History)

Joshua Phillippe
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2017
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Buddhism

Topics:

Keywords:

Buddhist Traditions (Art History)

Amy Guess
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2017
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Buddhism

Topics:

Keywords:

Buddhist Traditions (Art History)

Courtland Blade
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2017
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Buddhism

Topics:

Keywords:

Buddhist Traditions (Composition)

Rachel Barrett-Knight
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2017
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: English

Religious Traditions: Buddhism

Topics:

Keywords:

Buddhist Traditions (Music Appreciation)

Barry LeBlanc
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2017
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Buddhism

Topics:

Keywords:

Buddhist Traditions (Philosophy of Religion)

Tanya Martin
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2017
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Philosophy

Religious Traditions: Buddhism

Topics:

Keywords:

Buddhist Traditions (Philosophy)

Jeffrey Dodge
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2017
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Philosophy

Religious Traditions: Buddhism

Topics:

Keywords:

Buddhist Traditions (World History)

Patrick Meegan
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Buddhism

Topics:

Keywords:

Chosen Peoples, Chosen Nation

Henry Goldschmidt
Author

Wesleyan University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2006
Date Published

Description:

This course will examine a range of social, political and philosophical issues surrounding the concept of “chosenness”—the belief that a particular community (usually one’s own) has been singled out by God for some special favor or purpose. We will trace the roots of this concept in the Hebrew Bible, and examine a number of religious communities (including orthodox Jews, Puritan settlers, Black Hebrew Israelites, and the Christian Identity movement) who have claim-ed divine chosenness through narratives of Israelite descent. Above all, however, we will examine the role of chosenness in popular understandings of American national identity—tracing the history of United States claims to be a “chosen nation,” and exploring the way these claims may shape contemporary American foreign policy.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies

Religious Traditions: Judaism, Protestant

Topics: Empire/Foreign Policy/Globalism, Politics/Law/Government, Race/Ethnicity, Nationalism/War/Civil Religion

Keywords:

Christian American History and Culture (Anthropology)

Jonathan Arbuckle
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Anthropology

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords:

Christian American History and Culture (Art Appreciation)

Joanna Wos
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords:

Christian American History and Culture (Art History)

Joshua Phillippe
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords:

Christian American History and Culture (Art History)

Amy Guess
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords:

Christian American History and Culture (Art History)

Courtland Blade
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords:

Christian American History and Culture (English Composition)

Rachel Barrett-Knight
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: English

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords:

Christian American History and Culture (History)

Joe Skvarenina
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords:

Christian American History and Culture (Music Appreciation)

Barry LeBlanc
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2017
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords:

Christian American History and Culture (Philosophy)

Tanya Martin
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Philosophy, Other

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords:

Christian American History and Culture (Philosophy)

Jeffrey Dodge
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Philosophy, Other

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords:

Christian American History and Culture (Theatre Appreciation)

Alphonzo Atkins
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords:

Christian American History and Culture (US History)

Douglas Hammerling
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords:

Christian American History and Culture (World History)

Patrick Meegan
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords:

Christian Traditions (American History)

Audrey Jefferson
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords:

Christian Traditions (Anthropology)

Jonathan Arbuckle
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Anthropology

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords:

Christian Traditions (Art Appreciation)

Joanna Wos
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords:

Christian Traditions (Art History)

Joshua Phillippe
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords:

Christian Traditions (Art History)

Amy Guess
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords:

Christian Traditions (Art History)

Courtland Blade
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords:

Christian Traditions (History)

Joe Skvarenina
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords:

Christian Traditions (Intro to Ethics)

Barry LeBlanc
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Philosophy

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords:

Christian Traditions (Literature)

Rachel Barrett-Knight
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: English

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords:

Christian Traditions (Philosophy and Ethics)

Tanya Martin
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Philosophy

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords:

Christian Traditions (Philosophy)

Jeffrey Dodge
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Philosophy

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords:

Christian Traditions (Theatre Appreciation)

Alphonzo Atkins
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords:

Christian Traditions (US History)

Allen Smith
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords:

Christian Traditions (US History)

Douglas Hammerling
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords:

Christian Traditions (World History)

Patrick Meegan
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords:

Church and State in American History

Kathleen Flake
Author

Vanderbilt University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2004
Date Published

Description:

The objectives of this course are: to study the historical context of America’s contemporary debate over the proper relation of church and state; to analyze the seminal theories that have characterized historically the interpretation of the religion clauses of the constitution; and to become familiar with the uses of legal documents for historical research and theological reflection.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Graduate Course, Seminar

Discipline: Religious Studies, History

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions, Indigenous, Protestant

Topics: Family/Children/Reproduction, Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Politics/Law/Government, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars

Keywords: religious freedom, case law

Church and State in American History

Shelby M. Balik
Author

Metropolitan State University of Denver
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

Somewhere, in the overlapping space between religion and the state, Americans have sought to define their nation. But in that seemingly narrow overlap, they have imagined nearly infinite national identities and visions. How have Americans used religion to define national belonging, nation to define religious membership, and how have churchly and national polities given shape to each other? As we explore these questions, we’ll consider several key moments in American history that can shed light on the relationship between religion and the state. In particular, we’ll consider several questions. First, how have Americans understood religious liberty (or lack thereof) to serve the purposes of their society and nation? Second, how has religion intersected with politics during some of the fiercest debates of American history? Third, how has religious belief given rise to various political coalitions? And finally, how have Americans linked spiritual and national identity in different ways? By investigating these questions, perhaps we will come to a better understanding of what it has meant to be religious (or not) and American.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, American Studies, History

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Politics/Law/Government, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars

Keywords: religious freedom

Communal Utopias in America

Matthew J. Grow
Author

University of Southern Indiana
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2011
Date Published

Description:

From one perspective, these communal religions seem marginal to the American story. They have typically existed at the fringe of society, attracted only a tiny minority of America’s population, and formed countercultures to the American mainstream. For most contemporary Americans, communalism conjures up images of Shaker historic communities, hippie communes, or the traces of communalism that remain in modern American material culture—Oneida silverware, Shaker furniture, and Amana appliances. Nevertheless, throughout American history, these groups have captivated, bemused, and infuriated the broader public. Their efforts have provoked deep controversy as they questioned some of the most fundamental ideals of society—private property, capitalism, republican government, traditional gender roles, mainstream clothing and diet mores, and monogamous marriages. This course will examine attempts to implement utopias and communal societies in the American past and present. We will pay particular attention to nearby New Harmony, the site of two utopian experiments in the early 1800s

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions, New Religious Movements, Other Christianities

Topics: Business/Capitalism/Labor, Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords:

Comparing Two Congregations

Elfriede Wedam
Author

Loyola University Chicago
Institution

Assignment
Resource Type

2013
Date Published

Description:

Please take two of your observations and compare and contrast them according to the following rubric:

1) Type of ritual (what specific elements)

2) Relationship between the sacred and the profane (what indicators symbolize the difference)

3) One of the following sociological concepts:

a. Social class

b. Gender

c. Race/ethnicity

4) Conclude with one paragraph in which you explain what observing religious practices has taught you about religion in society.This paper should be approximately 3 – 4 pages.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Sociology

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Class/Power, Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords: comparative, religion, sociology, paper, social class, gender, race, ethnicity

Contemporary Cults and New Religious Movements (NRMs) in North America

David Bromley
Author

Virginia Commonwealth University
Institution


Resource Type

2007
Date Published

Description:

America is the most religiously diverse nation in the world. There are more than 2,500 separate religious organizations in the U.S., and the number of groups has increased steadily through our history. This is an introductory course in contemporary religious movements in North America. The focus of the course is on groups that emerged during the last half of the twentieth century, New Religious Movements (NRMs). The overall objective of the course is to examine the diversity of these movements and to make sense of them from a sociological perspective. This project involves understanding how these movements are distinctive, what gives rise to them, how they differ from one another, and how they develop through their histories.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Sociology

Religious Traditions: Buddhism, New Religious Movements

Topics:

Keywords: sociology, religion, social movement, comparative, groups, traditions, religious organizations

Contemporary Memoirs of African American Religion Syllabus

Vaughn Booker
Author

Dartmouth College
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2019
Date Published

Description:

This course presents African Americans who have created religious and spiritual lives amid the variety of possibilities for religious belonging in the second half of the twentieth century and the early twenty-first century. By engaging an emerging canon of autobiographies, we will take seriously the writings of theologians, religious laity, spiritual gurus, hip hop philosophers, LGBT clergy, religious minorities, and scholars of religion as foundational for considering contemporary religious authority through popular and/or institutional forms of African American religious leadership. Themes of spiritual formation and religious belonging as a process— healing, self-making, writing, growing up, renouncing, dreaming, and liberating—characterize the religious journeys of the African American writers, thinkers, and leaders whose works we will examine. Each weekly session will also incorporate relevant audiovisual religious media, including online exhibits, documentary films, recorded sermons, tv series, performance art, and music. 0

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Intro, Seminar

Discipline: Religious Studies, Other

African American / Africana / Black Studies

Religious Traditions: Buddhism, Islam, New Religious Movements, Other Christianities, Protestant

Yoruba, Taoism

Topics:

Keywords: African American religions, Africana religions, spirituality, religion and gender, religion and sexuality, religion and race

Contemporary Theorizing about Religion: Religious Economies/Rational Choice

The Association of Religion Data Archives
Author

IUPUI
Institution

Assignment
Resource Type

2020
Date Published

Description:

The ARDA Lesson Plans integrate content from the ARDA and other sources into teachable units. Each lesson has specific learning objectives, a host of relevant readings from which to choose, learning activities to utilize in class, and assessment tools to gauge students learning on the topic. Lesson plans contain links to the ARDA learning resources to make it easy for educators to use the ARDA in their teaching. The lessons are designed for courses in a wide range of disciplines, including history, political science, psychology, religious studies, and sociology. This assignment was created for the Association of Religion Data Archives.

Institution Type: Community College, Public College or University, Private College or University, Seminary

Class Type: Intro, Undergraduate Course, Graduate Course, Online, Seminar

Discipline: Religious Studies, Political Science, Sociology, Other

Economics

Religious Traditions: New Religious Movements, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords: religion, economics, secularization, comparative, rational choice, contemporary, research

Contemporary Theorizing about Religion: Secularization

The Association of Religion Data Archives
Author

IUPUI
Institution

Assignment
Resource Type

2020
Date Published

Description: The ARDA Lesson Plans integrate content from the ARDA and other sources into teachable units. Each lesson has specific learning objectives, a host of relevant readings from which to choose, learning activities to utilize in class, and assessment tools to gauge students learning on the topic. Lesson plans contain links to the ARDA learning resources to make it easy for educators to use the ARDA in their teaching. The lessons are designed for courses in a wide range of disciplines, including history, political science, psychology, religious studies, and sociology. This assignment was created for the Association of Religion Data Archives.

Institution Type: k-12 | Community College | Public College or University | Private College or University | Seminary

Class Type: Intro | Undergraduate Course | Graduate Course | Online | hybrid | Seminar

Discipline: Religious Studies | american_studies | Sociology

Religious Traditions: atheism/agnosticism/skepticism | general_comparative_traditions

Topics:

Keywords: sociology, secular, secularization, religion

Contemporary Theorizing about Religion: Subcultural Identity Theory, Strictness

The Association of Religion Data Archives
Author

IUPUI
Institution

Assignment
Resource Type

2020
Date Published

Description: The ARDA Lesson Plans integrate content from the ARDA and other sources into teachable units. Each lesson has specific learning objectives, a host of relevant readings from which to choose, learning activities to utilize in class, and assessment tools to gauge students learning on the topic. Lesson plans contain links to the ARDA learning resources to make it easy for educators to use the ARDA in their teaching. The lessons are designed for courses in a wide range of disciplines, including history, political science, psychology, religious studies, and sociology. This assignment was created for the Association of Religion Data Archives.0

Institution Type: k-12 | Community College | Public College or University | Private College or University | Seminary

Class Type: Intro | Undergraduate Course | Graduate Course | Online | hybrid | Seminar

Discipline: Religious Studies | american_studies | philosophy | Sociology

Religious Traditions: atheism/agnosticism/skepticism | general_comparative_traditions

Topics:

Keywords: sociology, religion, contemporary, culture, subculture, identity, strictness

Defining Religion

The Association of Religion Data Archives
Author

IUPUI
Institution

Assignment
Resource Type

2020
Date Published

Description:

The ARDA Lesson Plans integrate content from the ARDA and other sources into teachable units. Each lesson has specific learning objectives, a host of relevant readings from which to choose, learning activities to utilize in class, and assessment tools to gauge students learning on the topic. Lesson plans contain links to the ARDA learning resources to make it easy for educators to use the ARDA in their teaching. The lessons are designed for courses in a wide range of disciplines, including history, political science, psychology, religious studies, and sociology.This assignment was created for the Association of Religion Data Archives.

Institution Type: Community College, Public College or University, Private College or University, Seminary

Class Type: Intro, Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Anthropology, English, History, Political Science, Sociology, Theology

Religious Traditions: Buddhism, Catholic, Hinduism, Indigenous, Islam, Judaism, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords: religion, comparative, political science, sociology, definition

Defining Religion in America

Tisa Wenger
Author

Yale Divinity School
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2009
Date Published

Description:

This course examines how and in whose interests American concepts of and about “religion” have been produced. What cultural sites (the courts, the media, schools, the academy) are most influential in producing ideas about religion-in-general, or about particular kinds of religion? Who has the power to determine what groups are recognized as legitimate and therefore constitutionally protected religions? What is imagined to be the appropriate scope of religion’s impact in public life—is it primarily a private concern, or is it relevant to public interests? What relationship do such concepts of religion have with the politics of race, class, gender, and colonialism?

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Graduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, History

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions, Indigenous, Other Christianities, Other Traditions

Topics: Class/Power, Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Politics/Law/Government, Popular Culture/Media/Music/Sports, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords:

Denominationalism in America

Lydia Huffman Hoyle
Author

Georgetown College
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

1999
Date Published

Description:

This course will explore: 1.) the nature and sources of denominationalism in America; 2.) the genesis, development, theology, and practice of nine denominational families in America; 3.) the changing face of denominationalism in America today; and 4.) issues in denominationalism. Upon completion of this course, the responsible student will be able to discuss possible reasons why America was particularly well-suited for the development of multiple sects and denominations and discuss the importance of the Reformation in setting the stage for the development of denominations.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics: Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Theology/Liturgy

Keywords: field work, hostility

Disaster in American Religion & Culture Syllabus

Cooper Harriss
Author

Indiana University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2020
Date Published

Description:

This is an upper-level course listed in the Religion in the Americas section of IU’s religious studies curriculum. Capped at 25-30 students, it usually fills with a waiting list–in no small part because it satisfies multiple general education requirements. Students who subscribe to the class range from reigious studies majors to students taking what will be their only religious studies course. This syllabus represents my first attempt at teaching the course online, though the readings and topics have not changed radically in the transition from face-to-face learning.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course, Online

Discipline: Religious Studies

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Indigenous, Islam, Judaism, New Religious Movements, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords: Disaster, Culture, Film, Dance, Graphic Novels, Music, Blues, Theodicy,

Economics 1450r: Religion and Political Economy

Rachel McCleary
Author

Harvard University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2019
Date Published

Description:

This course looks at several different veins regarding economics and religion. Such topics include the Protestant Reformation, religiosity, secularization, economic growth and several others. Additionally the course sets out to discuss theories regarding capital accumulation, church and state, as well as social participation.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course, Graduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, History, Sociology, Other

Economics

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions, Islam

Topics: Business/Capitalism/Labor, Politics/Law/Government, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars

Economics

Keywords: Religion, social science, economics, sociology, political economy

Economics/Religious Studies 17: An Economic Approach to Religion

Michael McBride
Author

University of California-Irvine
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2017
Date Published

Description:

The purpose of this course is to teach how basic principles from economics yield a greater understanding of religious behavior. We will learn economic concepts step-by-step, use them to develop theories and predictions about various aspects of religion, and then review evidence in support of these theories. Simple ideas and clear examples will bring to light very interesting aspects of religious phenomena.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Intro, Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Other

Economics

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Business/Capitalism/Labor

Economics, Religion

Keywords: Religion, economics, discussion, intro

Ecstasy, Utopia, and Healing: Religious Experiments and American Moral Worlds

John C. Seitz
Author

Fordham University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2014
Date Published

Description:

This course approaches American religions through historical study of the pursuit of ecstatic, utopian, and healing experiences. We will seek to understand America’s religious past by investigating specific contexts in which Americans have sought radical release from everyday consciousness, social disorder, and pain. These pursuits, while distinct from one another in crucial ways, share an intense uneasiness with life as it is and an equally intense hopefulness in a particular solution. Sometimes people explicitly theorized these pursuits, but often they simply lived them as extensions of practical knowledge. In all cases we will explore the reasons for their hope as well as their responses to its triumph and its all-too-frequent failure. Whether successful or not, those driving these endeavors remained (sometimes despite their desires) permeated by and influential upon the worlds around them. Accordingly, we will explore the ways their hopes and desires—while often expressed with unique assertiveness and addressed with solutions considered radical—linked them with the wider communities from which they emerged.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, History

Religious Traditions: Catholic, General Comparative Traditions, Indigenous, New Religious Movements, Protestant

Topics: Gender/Women/ Sexuality, He​alth/Death, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords:

Ethnography Panels

Tricia Bruce
Author

Maryville College
Institution

Assignment
Resource Type

2013
Date Published

Description:

This assignment is designed to elicit common sociological themes across multiple religious traditions. You need to have read your ethnography in its entirety by the date of our first panel. Although others will have also read this book, this is not a group presentation: you do not need to coordinate your efforts as a group prior to the panels. If, however, you have questions regarding your reading, I would recommend finding time prior to the panels to discuss this with others who have read your ethnography. On panel days, we will rearrange our chairs to form a triangle and generate discussion around the questions posed below, applied to each of the ethnographies read by the class.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Anthropology, Sociology

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics:

Keywords: comparative religion, ethnography, panel, religion, sociology, presentation

Exploring American Religious History

Kathryn Gin Lum
Author

Stanford University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

This class sheds light on religion’s deep roots in American history in order to help students understand its continued significance today. The course is divided into five thematic units, each offering a different  way of understanding religion in America: 1) through the lens of the supernatural, 2) in its  entanglements with race, 3) as women’s history, 4) as entwined with American politics, and 5) in contemporary culture. Each unit begins with a session titled “What’s at stake?”, which focuses on secondary source debates over the topic more broadly. Other sessions in the unit typically pair a brief secondary source reading on the day’s specific topic with primary sources.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, American Studies, History

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords: thematic, religious freedom

Geography of American Religion

Elaine Peña
Author

George Washington University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2012
Date Published

Description:

This course combines perspectives from the fields of geography, anthropology, performance studies, and religious studies to cultivate a deeper understanding of how communities produce, maintain, and legitimize sanctified spaces. Although course readings direct our attention toward U.S.-based case studies, we will also consider their transnational dimensions—how religious groups build belief across national boundaries. We will pay particular attention to the political and economic factors that facilitate the development of transnational sacred spaces. In some cases, our starting points are actually located outside of the United States. By expanding our horizons, we will be able to critically engage the idea that American religious spaces, and notions of American religion more generally, are produced primarily within the boundaries of the U.S. nation-state.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, American Studies, Anthropology, Other

Geography

Religious Traditions: Buddhism, Catholic, General Comparative Traditions, Islam, New Religious Movements, Other Traditions, Protestant

Topics: Empire/Foreign Policy/Globalism, Region/Urban/Rural, Nationalism/War/Civil Religion

Keywords: Sacred space

Global Christianities

Angela Tarángo
Author

Trinity University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

What exactly is the Christian tradition? Can we even say that one exists? This class aims to challenge how students view Christianity by taking a tour of the varieties of world Christianity
that exist in the twentieth and twenty-first century, and by sampling a wide variety of methods in how one studies the field of Christianity. These will include historical, sociographical,
ethnohistorical, anthropological, theoretical, and gender studies methods, all of which challenge traditional (meaning mainly those steeped in the field of church history) scholars of religion to expand their understandings of Christianity in the modern period. This class is not a historical overview of Christianity and its variety of theologies, but rather it focuses on how Christianity in the modern period has become entangled with politics, race, sexuality, healing, issues of gender, revolution and religious strife (among other things.) This course focuses on content, methodology, and also seeks to situate each case study within current world events. In each section of this class we will consider case studies from all over the world including the Americas, Africa, Europe, Asia and the Middle East in order to both understand some of the main themes that trouble the study of modern Christianity along with the methods by which it is understood and studied.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Other

International Studies

Religious Traditions: Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics: Empire/Foreign Policy/Globalism, Gender/Women/ Sexuality, He​alth/Death, Politics/Law/Government, Region/Urban/Rural

Keywords:

God and War

Raymond Haberski
Author

IUPUI
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

From Puritans waging war against the Pequot tribe to prayers offered after September 11, 2001, Americans have understood war in religious terms.  This course introduces students to a historical debate over the connection between God and war in the United States. It looks to presidents, preachers, poets, and the American people for insight into that relationship and asks students to consider the conflict within religions and through religious terms as Americans fought, killed, and died for their country.0

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, History

Religious Traditions:

Topics: Nationalism/War/Civil Religion

Keywords: American civil religion, war, sacrifice, nationalism

Hindu American History and Culture (Anthropology)

Jonathan Arbuckle
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Anthropology

Religious Traditions: Hinduism

Topics:

Keywords:

Hindu American History and Culture (Art Appreciation)

Joanna Wos
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Hinduism

Topics:

Keywords:

Hindu American History and Culture (Art History)

Joshua Phillippe
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Hinduism

Topics:

Keywords:

Hindu American History and Culture (Art History)

Amy Guess
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Hinduism

Topics:

Keywords:

Hindu American History and Culture (Art History)

Courtland Blade
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Hinduism

Topics:

Keywords:

Hindu American History and Culture (Composition)

Rachel Barrett-Knight
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: English

Religious Traditions: Hinduism

Topics:

Keywords:

Hindu American History and Culture (History)

Joe Skvarenina
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Hinduism

Topics:

Keywords:

Hindu American History and Culture (Human Services)

Janet Rhodes-Carlson
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Other

Religious Traditions: Hinduism

Topics:

Keywords:

Hindu American History and Culture (Music Appreciation)

Barry LeBlanc
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Hinduism

Topics:

Keywords:

Hindu American History and Culture (Philosophy of Religion and Ethics)

Tanya Martin
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Philosophy

Religious Traditions: Hinduism

Topics:

Keywords:

Hindu American History and Culture (Philosophy)

Jeffrey Dodge
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Philosophy

Religious Traditions: Hinduism

Topics:

Keywords:

Hindu American History and Culture (US History)

Allen Smith
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Hinduism

Topics:

Keywords:

Hindu American History and Culture (US History)

Douglas Hammerling
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Hinduism

Topics:

Keywords:

Hindu American History and Culture (World History)

Patrick Meegan
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Hinduism

Topics:

Keywords:

Hindu Traditions (Anthropology)

Jonathan Arbuckle
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Anthropology

Religious Traditions: Hinduism

Topics:

Keywords:

Hindu Traditions (Art Appreciation)

Joanna Wos
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Hinduism

Topics:

Keywords:

Hindu Traditions (Art History)

Joshua Phillippe
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Hinduism

Topics:

Keywords:

Hindu Traditions (Art History)

Amy Guess
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Hinduism

Topics:

Keywords:

Hindu Traditions (Art History)

Courtland Blade
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Hinduism

Topics:

Keywords:

Hindu Traditions (History)

Joe Skvarenina
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Hinduism

Topics:

Keywords:

Hindu Traditions (Human Services)

Janet Rhodes-Carlson
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Other

Religious Traditions: Hinduism

Topics:

Keywords:

Hindu Traditions (Intro to Ethics)

Barry LeBlanc
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Philosophy

Religious Traditions: Hinduism

Topics:

Keywords:

Hindu Traditions (Literature)

Rachel Barrett-Knight
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: English

Religious Traditions: Hinduism

Topics:

Keywords:

Hindu Traditions (Philosophy of Religion and Ethics)

Tanya Martin
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Philosophy

Religious Traditions: Hinduism

Topics:

Keywords:

Hindu Traditions (Philosophy)

Jeffrey Dodge
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Philosophy

Religious Traditions: Hinduism

Topics:

Keywords:

Hindu Traditions (US History)

Allen Smith
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Hinduism

Topics:

Keywords:

Hindu Traditions (US History)

Douglas Hammerling
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Hinduism

Topics:

Keywords:

Hindu Traditions (World History)

Patrick Meegan
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Hinduism

Topics:

Keywords:

History of Christianity in North America

Kathryn Long
Author

Wheaton College
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

1996
Date Published

Description:

Purposes: To gain an overview of events, ideas, people and groups that have helped to shape Christianity in the United States and Canada from the colonial era to the present (with primary emphasis on Christianity in the U. S.). To become aware of the tensions, challenges and opportunities facing various expressions of the Christian church in North America and to examine “how the Christian religion has fared in America” (Noll, 3). In the context of that examination, we will ask, among others, the following questions: What has it meant to be a Christian in America, in relation to the church and to the culture? How has the Christian faith affected the public and private lives of people in North America? Who has shaped the story of Christianity on this continent and why? To locate ourselves as representatives of various denominations and religious traditions within the “community of memory” we belong to as professed Christians. To cultivate an enjoyment and appreciation of the complexity and rich heritage of Christianity in North America.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course, Graduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, History

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics: Family/Children/Reproduction, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Race/Ethnicity, Nationalism/War/Civil Religion

Keywords:

History of Christianity in the U.S.

Kathleen Riley
Author

Ohio Dominican College
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

1999
Date Published

Description:

This course is a survey of the major thoughts, movements and personalities of American Religious History, from the colonial era to the present day. A special emphasis will be placed on Catholicism, and its place in the religious landscape of the United States. Among the topics to be explored during the course of the semester will be: the religious motives for settling the New World; Awakenings, Revivals and Reform; Immigration and Nativism (Protestant-Catholic tensions); twentieth century “Isms” (Fundamentalism, Liberalism, Modernism and the “heresy” of Americanism); the Post Work War II Religious Revival; the crisis of the Sixties and the Second Vatican Council; and “Civil Religion” (the Religion of the American Republic) as a persistent force in American life and politics.

From the particular perspective of Catholicism, two persistent and pervasive themes will predominate: Immigration and Americanization. Our focus will be on the internal evolution of American Catholicism as it met and absorbed divergent social and ethnic groups, and that of the external relations between the Catholic community and the greater Protestant national community. This focus will allow us to explore, with historical evidence, the more theoretical issues of diversity/pluralism/multiculturalism in American history, and the relations between elites and subordinates – Insiders and Outsiders. Few communities in American History have sustained in such large numbers and over such a long period of time the varieties of peoples as American Catholicism.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: American Studies, History, Theology

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics: Immigration/Refugees, Race/Ethnicity, Nationalism/War/Civil Religion, Theology/Liturgy

Keywords:

History of Religion in America

Laurie F. Maffly-Kipp
Author

University of North Carolina
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

1993
Date Published

Description:

This course is a survey of religion in America from the pre-colonial era to the present. Although this is a large class, our goal will be to explore together certain moments and themes in American religious history that have significantly shaped the development of the nation as a whole. The approach will be chronological, that is, we will move through time from the pre-colonial context to the late twentieth century; but our aim will be to connect past events to issues and problems that continue to affect the expression of religious beliefs and practices in our own culture. At times, we will employ a “case study” approach: rather than trying to cover every significant religious development and each religious group, we will analyze specific events and ideas that have a wider applicability.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, American Studies, History

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Race/Ethnicity, Nationalism/War/Civil Religion

Keywords:

History of Religion in America

Charles Israel
Author

Auburn University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2006
Date Published

Description:

In this course we will explore in both broad scope and some more focused case-studies the role religion has played in North American social, cultural, and even political history. The object is to explore religion both as an extraordinary experience or abstract idea and as an important component of individual and group social identity in the American past. We can all agree that there were churches, congregations, and denominations in the American past; but how did religion operate in American history? What was the interaction between otherworldly faiths and present, worldly, and temporal interests of humans?

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, History

Religious Traditions: Catholic, General Comparative Traditions, Islam, Protestant

Topics: Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Politics/Law/Government, Popular Culture/Media/Music/Sports, Race/Ethnicity, Region/Urban/Rural

Keywords:

History of Religion in America

Paul Harvey
Author

University of Colorado, Colorado Springs
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

1996
Date Published

Description:

In this block we will probe, discuss, and analyze the multiple religious traditions in America. Each student will prepare and present a research project, which may be historical or contemporary, that will focus on a particular religious tradition. Additionally, “fieldwork” will be done in which each student will be asked to participate in a religious event of some sort which will be foreign to your experience, whether that be in a fundamentalist mega-church, a Jewish synagogue, or a New Age temple. We will make a trip to the Baca campus and visit the Carmelite monastery there, and observe their ritual day. Class time will be oriented around discussion of specific texts, with period short lectures to fill in necessary factual material. To encourage discussion of the material, students will also be asked to prepare one or two email responses a week in reaction to questions set by the moderator of our email discussion group (I will serve as the moderator).

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Anthropology, History

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Immigration/Refugees, Popular Culture/Media/Music/Sports, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars

Keywords: block plan, class intensive, big picture, consumerism

History of Religion in America

Steven Epperson
Author

Brigham Young University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

1996
Date Published

Description:

We intend to examine the story of the religious “experience” of the American people from the 16th century to the present. Our principal concerns are to gain a better understanding of a) the essential beliefs and practices of America’s religious communities, b) the major interpretive themes employed to make sense of the American religious story, c) aspects of the interaction between religion and American culture, and d) the role individuals play in the formation and sustenance of religious movements and institutions.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, History

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars

Keywords:

History of Religion in the U.S.

Charles F. Irons
Author

Elon University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2009
Date Published

Description:

This course offers a selective survey of American Religious History from pre-Columbian times to the present. It emphasizes the remarkable diversity of religious belief and practice in the area that became the United States. Challenging theoretical questions about the essence of religion and the scholarly study of it are an essential part of the course.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, History

Religious Traditions: Buddhism, General Comparative Traditions, New Religious Movements, Other Christianities, Other Traditions, Protestant

Topics: Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Politics/Law/Government, Race/Ethnicity, Nationalism/War/Civil Religion

Keywords:

History of Religion in the United States

Elizabeth L. Jemison
Author

Clemson University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2017
Date Published

Description:

This course offers a broad introduction to American religious history from the 1600s to today. As we travel together from the early colonial period to the present, our course will consider four
important themes in the history of religion in the United States. By the semester’s end, students will be able to describe and analyze important aspects such as church and state, race and religion, and the challenges of pluralism, as well as have a solid understanding of the historical development of American religious cultures.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, History

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Immigration/Refugees, Politics/Law/Government, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords: religious freedom

History of Religion in the United States

Evelyn Sterne
Author

University of Rhode Island
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2006
Date Published

Description:

This course will explore the history of religion in the United States from the colonial period to the present, with emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Our focus will be less on theological issues than on the political, cultural, ethnic, racial and gender dimensions of religion. Major themes will include: the diversity of religious traditions in this nation; the intersections between religion and politics; and the ways in which religion has shaped and been shaped by national, ethnic and racial identities. Throughout the course, we will bring together past and present by discussing how the study of religious history informs our understanding of current issues and debates.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, History

Religious Traditions: Catholic, General Comparative Traditions, Indigenous, Judaism, New Religious Movements, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics: Gender/Women/ Sexuality, He​alth/Death, Immigration/Refugees, Politics/Law/Government, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords:

History of Religion Post-Civil War America

Richard J. Callahan
Author

University of Missouri-Columbia
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2005
Date Published

Description:

The course attempts to illustrate the dynamic and powerful role that religion has played, and continues to play, in the social, cultural, political, economic, and creative aspects of realms of American life. Because of the broad scope of the subject, a course such as this one can only survey the landscape rather than being a comprehensive account. We will pay special attention to the diversity of American traditions and cultures while we also look for patterns that emerge from their shared history as Americans. We will also explore the history of a few selected religious
issues more thoroughly. We will be attentive to issues of power that have shaped American religious history, the ways we interpret that history, and the ways we think about religion. By the end of the course, you should be familiar with a general chronological overview of historical developments and issues in American religion.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, History

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Protestant

Topics: Class/Power, Politics/Law/Government, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Region/Urban/Rural, Nationalism/War/Civil Religion, Science/Technology/Environment

Keywords:

History of Religious Life and Practice in Canada and the U.S.

Eleanor J. Stebner
Author

The University of Winnipeg
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

1999
Date Published

Description:

This course provides a study of the history of religious life and practice in Canada and the United States from the time of European colonization to the present. It includes the study of select individuals, church and state relations, and comparisons between the Canadian and U.S. nation-states. Various denominations and sects that comprise the North American religious milieu are highlighted, as are significant movements such as evangelicalism, fundamentalism, feminism, and ecumenism. Historical analysis will inevitably lead to discussions regarding Christianity within our current time and contexts. A combination of lecture and seminar format is utilized.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University, Seminary

Class Type: Graduate Course, Seminar

Discipline: Area Studies, History, Theology

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Protestant

Topics: Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Politics/Law/Government, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Race/Ethnicity, Region/Urban/Rural, Theology/Liturgy

Keywords:

Indigenous Christianities

Brandon Bayne
Author

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2017
Date Published

Description:

This course examines diverse indigenous engagements with Christianity in the Americas from earliest contacts to the present. Topics will range from missionary contestations in colonial Mexico to the Native American Church’s fight for religious freedom in 20th Century United States, from historical  revitalization movements like the Ghost Dance to postcolonial indigenous theologies in North and  South America. Along the way, we will consider a variety of responses to Christian evangelism; including rejection, revitalization, revolt, and renewal. The title of the course implies multiplicity;  “native and Christian” can be an opposition, tension, identification, combination, or all of the above. We will wrestle with how to appreciate cultural continuities, account for historical changes and  articulate new religious combinations. At the same time, we will tackle questions of violence, asymmetrical power, colonization, and the need for decolonized methodologies. Students should come prepared for an active, lively discussion, and ready to critically investigate the readings, while I will provide short lectures on historical background. Our work together will culminate with research projects on contemporary expressions of indigenous Christianity that will apply the theoretical, historical, and methodological tools acquired in the course.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Other

American Indian Studies, Indigenous Studies

Religious Traditions: Indigenous, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics: Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords: Syncretism, religious freedom

Intro to the Visual Culture of American Religions

Kristin Schwain
Author

University of Missouri-Columbia
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2004
Date Published

Description:

Due to the introductory nature of the course, we will survey a variety of objects from a number of American religious traditions. Each week we will center our attention on a different type of object and a different model of intellectual inquiry. In the first section of the course, “Tools of Art Historical Interpretation,” we will learn basic skills of visual analysis through our examination of Northwest Coast aesthetics, African-American Bible quilts, New England gravestones, and Warner Sallman’s Head of Christ. Then, we will use these interpretive tools to examine religious “ways of seeing” that characterize particular traditions and at certain historical moments. In Part III, we will analyze how objects are used by a variety of traditions to mediate different temporal moments, geographic locations, and cultural contexts. In the end, we will recognize the manifold ways objects shape religious beliefs and practices and inflect ways of seeing and knowing,

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Intro, Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, The Arts

Religious Traditions: Catholic, General Comparative Traditions, Indigenous, Islam, Judaism, Protestant

Topics: He​alth/Death, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords: sacred space, altars

Introducing World Religions

The Association of Religion Data Archives
Author

IUPUI
Institution

Assignment
Resource Type

2020
Date Published

Description: The ARDA Lesson Plans integrate content from the ARDA and other sources into teachable units. Each lesson has specific learning objectives, a host of relevant readings from which to choose, learning activities to utilize in class, and assessment tools to gauge students learning on the topic. Lesson plans contain links to the ARDA learning resources to make it easy for educators to use the ARDA in their teaching. The lessons are designed for courses in a wide range of disciplines, including history, political science, psychology, religious studies, and sociology. This assignment was created for the Association of Religion Data Archives.

Institution Type: k-12 | Community College | Public College or University | Private College or University | Seminary

Class Type: Intro | Undergraduate Course | Graduate Course | Online | hybrid | Seminar

Discipline: Religious Studies | american_studies | philosophy | Sociology

Religious Traditions: atheism/agnosticism/skepticism | Buddhism | Catholic | general_comparative_traditions | Hinduism | Indigenous | Islam | Judaism | New Religious Movements | Other Christianities | Protestant

Topics:

Keywords: world, religion, sociology, introduction, research

Introduction to American Religion

Winnifred Fallers Sullivan
Author

Washington and Lee University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

1996
Date Published

Description:

What is American Religion? Does it make any sense to talk about American religion? What is American about American religion and what is religious about American religion? Religion in the United States is extremely vital and diverse. It has been throughout American history. It is also a very important part of contemporary American culture and politics. It is impossible in one term to hope to canvass the depth and variety of five centuries of American religion in a complete way. This course will instead introduce the student to religion in America through the consideration of three thematic approaches to a description of American religion as a whole. These thematic approaches cut across religious traditions and attempt to characterize some of the ways in which the extraordinary variety in the American religious imagination shares characteristics by virtue of its common environment and its common history. The three thematic descriptions of American religion that we will examine are Natural Religion, Denominational Religion, and Constitutional Religion. There are of course other themes that could be chosen and we will from time to time note those other themes as they touch on our work. The object of the course is to develop in the student a beginning competence in thinking, talking and writing about American religion.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Intro, Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, American Studies

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions, Indigenous

Topics: Family/Children/Reproduction, Politics/Law/Government, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords:

Introduction to Religion in America

D. Keith Naylor
Author

Occidental College
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

1993
Date Published

Description:

Participants in this survey course will examine religion in the USA from historical and socio-cultural perspectives. Our most persistent questions will be, “What is religion?” and “What is America?” We shall explore the contours of American culture and society as a setting in which various religions are imagined, established, nurtured, hindered, altered, valued, ignored, and/or abandoned. This course will include lectures, assigned readings, class discussions, student panels, and films/videos.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Intro, Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, American Studies

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Nationalism/War/Civil Religion

Keywords:

Is America a Christian Nation? Ask an Expert video

R&AC
Author

IUPUI
Institution

Video
Resource Type

2003
Date Published

Description:

Video from the “Ask an Expert” series responding to the question “Is America a Christian Nation?”Produced by the Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Intro, Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies

Religious Traditions: Protestant

Topics:

Keywords: America, Christian, Nation

Is Barbie Jewish? “The Tribe” (video)

Laura Levitt
Author

Temple University
Institution

Assignment
Resource Type

2020
Date Published

Description:

This assignment is for the first week of class. It uses the short video, “The Tribe” (available online), to get students to think about what it means to identify as Jewish. Barbie becomes the object lesson both in the film and in the question. Is she Jewish? Or not? Students need to make a case and there are no wrong answers. Having shown the film in class when I taught in person, this assignment allowed me to get to know each student and respond to them (class of 27 students) in a no pressure and playful manner. It was an ice-breaker from afar.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course, Online

Discipline: Religious Studies, Other

Jewish studies

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Identification, religion, race, ethnicity, culture

Keywords: Jewish, identification, Barbie, religion, race, ethnicity, culture

Is there a difference between “spiritual” and “religious”? Ask an Expert video

R&AC
Author

IUPUI
Institution

Video
Resource Type

2003
Date Published

Description:

Video from the “Ask an Expert” series responding to the question “Is there a difference between “spiritual” and “religious”?” Produced by the Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Intro, Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies

Religious Traditions:

Topics:

Keywords: Spiritual, Religious

Islamic Traditions (American History)

Audrey Jefferson
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Islam

Topics:

Keywords:

Islamic Traditions (Anthropology)

Jonathan Arbuckle
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Anthropology

Religious Traditions: Islam

Topics:

Keywords:

Islamic Traditions (Art Appreciation)

Joanna Wos
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Islam

Topics:

Keywords:

Islamic Traditions (Art History)

Joshua Phillippe
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Islam

Topics:

Keywords:

Islamic Traditions (Art History)

Amy Guess
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Islam

Topics:

Keywords:

Islamic Traditions (Art History)

Courtland Blade
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Islam

Topics:

Keywords:

Islamic Traditions (Composition and Literature)

Rachel Barrett-Knight
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: English

Religious Traditions: Islam

Topics:

Keywords:

Islamic Traditions (Creative Writing)

Rachel Barrett-Knight
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: English

Religious Traditions: Islam

Topics:

Keywords:

Islamic Traditions (History and Geography)

Joe Skvarenina
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Islam

Topics:

Keywords:

Islamic Traditions (Intro to Ethics)

Barry LeBlanc
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Philosophy

Religious Traditions: Islam

Topics:

Keywords:

Islamic Traditions (Philosophy)

Tanya Martin
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Philosophy, Other

Religious Traditions: Islam

Topics:

Keywords:

Islamic Traditions (Philosophy)

Jeffrey Dodge
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Philosophy

Religious Traditions: Islam

Topics:

Keywords:

Islamic Traditions (US History)

Allen Smith
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Islam

Topics:

Keywords:

Islamic Traditions (US History)

Douglas Hammerling
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Islam

Topics:

Keywords:

Islamic Traditions (World History)

Patrick Meegan
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Islam

Topics:

Keywords:

Jewish American History and Culture (American History)

Audrey Jefferson
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Keywords:

Jewish American History and Culture (Anthropology)

Alphonzo Atkins
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Anthropology

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Keywords:

Jewish American History and Culture (Anthropology)

Jonathan Arbuckle
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Anthropology

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Keywords:

Jewish American History and Culture (Art Appreciation)

Joanna Wos
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Keywords:

Jewish American History and Culture (Art History)

Amy Guess
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Keywords:

Jewish American History and Culture (Art History)

Joshua Phillippe
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Keywords:

Jewish American History and Culture (History)

Joe Skvarenina
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Keywords:

Jewish American History and Culture (Literature and Composition)

Rachel Barrett-Knight
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: English

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Keywords:

Jewish American History and Culture (Music Appreciation)

Barry LeBlanc
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Keywords:

Jewish American History and Culture (Philosophy and Ethics)

Tanya Martin
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Philosophy

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Keywords:

Jewish American History and Culture (Philosophy)

Jeffrey Dodge
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Philosophy

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Keywords:

Jewish American History and Culture (US History)

Douglas Hammerling
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Keywords:

Jewish American History and Culture (US History)

Allen Smith
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Keywords:

Jewish American History and Culture (World History)

Patrick Meegan
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Keywords:

Jewish American History Culture (Art History)

Courtland Blade
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Keywords:

Jewish History in the United States

Rachel B. Gross
Author

San Francisco State University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2017
Date Published

Description:

This course uses questions about communities as the basis for a survey of U.S. Jewish history from the colonial period through the present. We
will move between studies of specific Jewish communities and conceptions of national U.S. Jewish communities, asking questions about communities that be applied to other groups in and beyond the U.S., including those in which class members participate. How should we define community? How do communities function and how are they maintained? How have gender norms and expectations shaped communities? Who and what has held power in U.S. Jewish communities? Are U.S. Jews one community or many communities?

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, American Studies, History

Jewish Studies

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics: Class/Power, Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Immigration/Refugees, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords:

Jewish Traditions (American History)

Audrey Jefferson
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Keywords:

Jewish Traditions (Anthropology)

Jonathan Arbuckle
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Anthropology

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Keywords:

Jewish Traditions (Art Appreciation)

Joanna Wos
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Keywords:

Jewish Traditions (Art History)

Joshua Phillippe
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Keywords:

Jewish Traditions (Art History)

Amy Guess
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Keywords:

Jewish Traditions (Art History)

Courtland Blade
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Keywords:

Jewish Traditions (Composition and Literature)

Rachel Barrett-Knight
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: English

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Keywords:

Jewish Traditions (Humanities)

Joe Skvarenina
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History, Other

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Keywords:

Jewish Traditions (Intro to Ethics)

Barry LeBlanc
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Philosophy

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Keywords:

Jewish Traditions (Philosophy)

Tanya Martin
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Philosophy

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Keywords:

Jewish Traditions (Philosophy)

Jeffrey Dodge
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Philosophy

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Keywords:

Jewish Traditions (Theatre Appreciation)

Alphonzo Atkins
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Keywords:

Jewish Traditions (US History)

Allen Smith
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Keywords:

Jewish Traditions (US History)

Douglas Hammerling
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Keywords:

Jewish Traditions (World History)

Patrick Meegan
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Judaism

Topics:

Keywords:

L2430: Analysing Religion and Politics

Stratos Patrikios
Author

University of Strathclyde
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2014
Date Published

Description:

Defying the predictions of secularization theory regarding the decline of religion in the modern world, religion is resurfacing in global affairs. The impact of faith upon politics is evident in the 1979 revolution in Iran, in the subsequent, ongoing conflicts in Afghanistan and the Middle East and their implications for international security, in the Catholic Church’s contribution to democratization efforts in Latin America and Eastern Europe, in the religious dimension of recent electoral results in the USA, and in the role of Christian actors in current debates on Islam in the EU. The class introduces students to the systematic study of these phenomena mainly using a quantitative methods perspective. Qualitative approaches are also considered. We will examine religion’s role in politics across cultures, states and regions. The seminar is about the empirical application of relevant theoretical frameworks.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Political Science, Sociology

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Politics/Law/Government

Keywords: religion, government, church and state, political science, modernity

Latina/o Religions

Brett Hendrickson
Author

Lafayette College
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

Latinas/os, or people who trace their ancestry to the countries of Latin America and the Spanish-speaking Caribbean, are the largest minority group in the United States. Religion forms
an important part of the lives of many Latinas/os. From various expressions of Catholicism, to Protestant and Pentecostal movements, to religions that draw on African heritage and folk
devotions, many Hispanics have a rich religious life. Adding to this richness, Latinas/os are a diverse group made up of communities that claim distinct countries of national origin, including
Mexicans, Cubans, Puerto Ricans, and people from Central and South America. This course explores the history and practice of several major Latina/o religions, the role religion plays in ethnic identity formation and maintenance, the ways in which religion aids Latinas/os in a context often touched by racism and prejudice, and the cultural products associated with Hispanic religions.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies

Religious Traditions: Catholic, General Comparative Traditions, New Religious Movements

Topics: Race/Ethnicity

Keywords:

Law and Religion in U.S. History

Linda Przybyszewski
Author

University of Cincinnati
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

1999
Date Published

Description:

This course focuses on the relationship between religion and law in a country without an established church. Despite this constitutional separation between church and state, many American believed that faith in God in some form was necessary to the success of the Republic. Historians of religion write that the United States had established Protestantism, in effect, voluntarily and informally during the 19th century. We will be looking at the attempts of various Americans to determine what the proper relationship between religion and law should be.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: American Studies, History

Religious Traditions: Protestant

Topics: Politics/Law/Government, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords:

Lived Religion in America: Institutions, Innovations, and Individuals

Julie Byrne
Author

Duke University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2004
Date Published

Description:

When most people in the United States think of religion, they think of beliefs. But beliefs are only a small part of religion in a country full of people of faith who also practice, mix, play, dispute, reform, consume, market, support, change,and leave their religions. In short, people don’t just believe religion; they live it. In this class, we will explore “lived religion” in America. Along the way, we will continuously raise a few key questions: Who lives lived religion? What are the advantages and disadvantages to thinking of religion this way? What are particularly American features of lived religion? What do we see about particular traditions through the lens of lived religion?

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies

Religious Traditions: Catholic, General Comparative Traditions, Islam, Other Christianities

Mormonism

Topics: Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Race/Ethnicity, Nationalism/War/Civil Religion

Keywords: Field work

Malcom, Martin, and Masculinity

Jonathan L. Walton
Author

Harvard Divinity School
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2011
Date Published

Description:

The Civil Rights and Black Power movements (narrowly defined) were principally struggles for racial equality and economic justice. The public ministries of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X have come to signify these movements respectively and have remained at the center of debates concerning competing trajectories of response. But though the philosophies of Malcolm and Martin are often portrayed as incommensurate, their philosophical and theological commitments led them to a similar place of aligning with the poor and oppressed on a global scale. This is not their only similarity. Both Martin and Malcolm extend from religious traditions where notions of social respectability and hyper-masculinity are inextricably linked to gendered conceptions of racial progress. The aim of this course, then, is to engage the theological, philosophical and social thought of these men while unmasking normative assumptions about race, domesticity and sexuality that informed their outlooks and animated their gendered moral frameworks and masculinist organizing strategies.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University, Seminary

Class Type: Graduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Theology

Religious Traditions: Islam, Protestant

Topics: Class/Power, Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Race/Ethnicity, Theology/Liturgy

Keywords:

Media, Religion, and Culture

Eric K. Gormly
Author

Arizona State University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

1999
Date Published

Description:

Among academics, there is a growing awareness of the need to examine media, religion and culture from perspectives simultaneously informed by religious studies, sociology, cultural studies, journalism, and studies in communication and mass communication. It is a nascent, cross-disciplinary field that relies on the full range of methodological approaches available to the contemporary scholar. Because the field has developed so recently, little has been done to synthesize these areas and advance the field. This course represents an early attempt at fusing these elements into one comprehensive framework.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Graduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Other

Interdisciplinary, Media Studies, Communication Studies, Journalism

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Popular Culture/Media/Music/Sports, Science/Technology/Environment

Keywords: televangelism

Method and Theory in the Study of Religion: An Anthropological Approach

Kevin Lewis O'Neill
Author

University of Toronto
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2012
Date Published

Description:

The anthropology of religion is a discipline-specific endeavor. British Functionalism, French Structuralism, American cultural anthropology—the history of anthropological thought can be taught through the very category of religion. But what of the study of religion’s continued rapprochement with the anthropology of religion? How might the study of religion, a discipline in its own right, draw upon anthropological approaches to religion without succumbing to discipline-specific debates? This graduate course addresses this methodological question through a reading intensive course. While its success will turn on the entire class keeping up with the readings for each week, its lasting effect will depend on the student’s ability to appreciate not so much the history of anthropological thought or the anthropology of religion but rather what this course ultimately calls “anthropological approaches to the study of religion.”

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Graduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Anthropology

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics:

Methodology

Keywords: theory of religion

Modernity, Secularization, Religious Persistence, Spiritual Transformation

Christian Smith
Author

University of Notre Dame
Institution


Resource Type

2008
Date Published

Description:

This class provides an introduction to the long-standing and wide-ranging debates in sociology about secularization. The central question that we will explore from a variety of perspectives is: What happens to religion under the conditions of modernity—and why and how so? What we will be trying to figure out is whether modernity (and post-modernity) secularizes religion, strengthens religion, transforms religion, or produces some other effect. Secularization was a central concern in the thinking of the founding fathers of sociology—Weber, Durkheim, Marx, and others. It has also been the core concern of the field of sociology of religion from the start.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Sociology

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars

Keywords: modernity, secularization, religion, sociology, spiritual, civil religion, identity, american

Modernity, Secularization, Religious Persistence, Spiritual Transformation

Christian Smith
Author

University of Notre Dame
Institution


Resource Type

2008
Date Published

Description:

The key question we will explore is: What happens to religion under conditions of modernity, why, and how? This exploration first requires a more fundamental consideration of the nature of “modernity” and “religion” as concepts and realities themselves. It also involves thinking about what we might mean in saying that religion is, for instance, “strong,” “growing,” “declining,” or “losing authority.” Engaging the secularization debate also necessarily raises questions about human beings and their constitutional needs and tendencies, human societies and their requirements and operations, and basic sociological concerns with historical change, causal attributions, research design, data collection methods, measurement, and analysis. Throughout this seminar I want us to attend closely not only to associations between measured variables but also to the causal mechanisms theorized as promoting or preventing secularization. Working through the specific analytical issue of secularization therefore both grounds us solidly in debates at the heart of the field sociology of religion specifically, and engages us in a variety of important concerns that are crucial to consider for the doing of any good work in sociology generally. 0

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Graduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Sociology

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars

Keywords: modernity, secularization, religion, sociology, civil religion, politics, race

Mormonism and American Culture

Peter Thuesen
Author

IUPUI
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2017
Date Published

Description:

Because of its relatively recent origins, the Mormon tradition is an ideal case for studying a religion in the making. The Latter-day Saints also offer a unique window on how religions evolved under the U.S. Constitution’s system of the separation of church and state. Accordingly, this course focuses not only on the basics of Mormonism itself (its history, beliefs, and practices) but also on questions of wider significance in the study of American religion.0

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, History

Religious Traditions: New Religious Movements, Other Christianities

Topics:

Keywords: Mormonism, Latter-day Saint, First Amendment, Christianity, restorationism, polygamy, scripture

Muslim American History and Culture (Anthropology)

Jonathan Arbuckle
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Anthropology

Religious Traditions: Islam

Topics:

Keywords:

Muslim American History and Culture (Art Appreciation)

Joanna Wos
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2017
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Islam

Topics:

Keywords:

Muslim American History and Culture (Art History)

Amy Guess
Author


Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type:

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Islam

Topics:

Keywords:

Muslim American History and Culture (Art History)

Courtland Blade
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Islam

Topics:

Keywords:

Muslim American History and Culture (History)

Joe Skvarenina
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Islam

Topics:

Keywords:

Muslim American History and Culture (Literature and Composition)

Rachel Barrett-Knight
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: English

Religious Traditions: Islam

Topics:

Keywords:

Muslim American History and Culture (Music Appreciation)

Barry LeBlanc
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Islam

Topics:

Keywords:

Muslim American History and Culture (Philosophy and Ethics)

Tanya Martin
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Philosophy

Religious Traditions: Islam

Topics:

Keywords:

Muslim American History and Culture (Philosophy)

Jeffrey Dodge
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: Philosophy

Religious Traditions: Islam

Topics:

Keywords:

Muslim American History and Culture (US History)

Allen Smith
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Islam

Topics:

Keywords:

Muslim American History and Culture (US History)

Douglas Hammerling
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Islam

Topics:

Keywords:

Muslim American History and Culture (World History)

Patrick Meegan
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Islam

Topics:

Keywords:

Muslim American History Culture (American History)

Audrey Jefferson
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: History

Religious Traditions: Islam

Topics:

Keywords:

Muslim American History Culture (Art History)

Joshua Phillippe
Author

Ivy Tech
Institution

Teaching Module
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

IUPUI partnered with Ivy Tech Community College to introduce fifteen community college instructors to the religious traditions of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist communities in greater Indianapolis. With support from NEH, “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” utilized primary and secondary humanities texts and humanities experts at several local universities, supplemented by field trips and discussions with local practitioners, to explore these five world religions, their history and life in the United States, and their presence in and contributions to cultural life in the metropolitan area. The program resulted in the production of 150 course modules that incorporate knowledge about world religions into Ivy Tech’s core humanities curriculum.

Institution Type: Community College

Class Type:

Discipline: The Arts

Religious Traditions: Islam

Topics:

Keywords:

New Religion Assignments

Rebecca Moore
Author

San Diego State University
Institution

Assignment
Resource Type

2014
Date Published

Description:

This is a combination of several assignments including an analytical paper in which students are asked to compare and contrast arguments from readings. Additionally a separate assignment revolves around visiting a Special Collections whereby students will identify an item relating to New Thought or New Age, examine it both physically and materially and write a short descriptive paper. The second section of this assignment requires that the student travel to a worship service and observe the service and it’s characteristics such as demographics, topics covered, and general ambience. The final assignment addressed in this course is about a particular new religion and how the media has covered it.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Sociology

Religious Traditions: New Religious Movements, Other Christianities

Topics:

Keywords: new religions, religion, sociology, analytical, media

New Religious Movements in the US Syllabus

James Bennett
Author

Santa Clara University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2019
Date Published

Description:

A syllabus of a New Religious Movements course

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, History

Religious Traditions: New Religious Movements

Topics:

Keywords: cult, Mormonism, Christian Science, Nation of Islam, Branch Davidians, Scientology, Jonestown, People's Temple, Shakers, Oneida

New Religious Movements, Popular Media, and Violence in American History

Stephen Taysom
Author

Cleveland State University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

This course explores the phenomenon of “New Religious Movements,” sometimes called “cults.” We look at how NRM is actually a category group’s move into and out of, rather than a
fixed list of religious traditions; it is a label that almost no group embraces. In the American context, nearly every religious group that has come to enjoy social approval and a “mainstream” label spent some time in the NRM category. The popular media is one of the key tools that facilitate the creation and maintenance of the NRM category. We will look at how various media outlets (pamphlets, newspapers, radio, television, and the Internet) use the NRM category, why they do so, and explore the impact this has on the broader society. Finally, this course looks at how violence, both physical and rhetorical, is an integral part of the way that the NRM category has functioned in the American context since the 17th century.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies

Religious Traditions: New Religious Movements

Topics: Class/Power, Politics/Law/Government, Popular Culture/Media/Music/Sports, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars

Keywords:

North American Religious History Assignment

Adrian Weimer
Author

Providence College
Institution

Assignment
Resource Type

2020
Date Published

Description:

“A Town Petitions against Arbitrary Government”Primary Source Analysis of a Petition from the Inhabitants of Hadley, Massachusetts Bay Colony, April 25, 1665 (Massachusetts Archives CVI.107)Includes manuscript image, annotated transcription, discussion questions, and further reading.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, History, Political Science, Theology

Religious Traditions: Protestant

Topics:

Keywords: Puritans, Petitions, Monarchy, Government, Liberty

Pandemic Religion

n/a n/a
Author

Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, George Mason University
Institution

Assignment
Resource Type

2020
Date Published

Description:

Pandemic Religion is a project that seeks to collect sources on how American religious groups have responded to the COVID-19 pandemic. This teaching guide offers an easy-to-adopt assignment for students who wish to contribute to the collection.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Intro, Undergraduate Course, Online, Seminar

Discipline: Religious Studies, History, Theology

Religious Traditions: Buddhism, Catholic, Hinduism, Indigenous, Islam, Judaism, New Religious Movements, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords: pandemic, COVID-19, digital history, digital humanities

Paper Topic: Experiencing a Different Religion

David Campbell
Author

University of Notre Dame
Institution

Assignment
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

One part is to research the history, beliefs, practices, and political involvement of your chosen tradition. You will need to consult both scholarly research and what the religion says about itself in its own literature (including websites, books, pamphlets, etc.). The second part is a visit to a congregation representing the tradition you have chosen to study. Since you will be ambassadors of Notre Dame, please be sure to dress and act appropriately during the service. Learn when the service starts and ends so that you can arrive early and stay until the end. If you have questions about the service many congregations have a website to consult, or you can call the congregation’s office and ask about appropriate attire, length of the service, etc. You are welcome to attend a service in the South Bend area, in your hometown, or anywhere else of your choosing. Students in the class are also welcome to attend a service in small groups, keeping in mind the need not to be disruptive. You will find that nearly all congregations are very welcoming to visitors, so you should not be shy about introducing yourself and explaining the purpose of your visit.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Sociology

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Politics/Law/Government

Keywords: comparative religions, religion, political science, area studies, sociology, traditions, paper

Paper Topic: The Political Implications of Religious Switching

David Campbell
Author

University of Notre Dame
Institution

Assignment
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

The purpose of this paper is to have students respond to religious switching among Americans, specifically the use of examples from Amazing Grace and any other assigned readings. Questions include: ‘What are the political implications of the relatively high rate of religious switching among Americans?, ‘In answering this question, you will want to consider the possible effects on America’s religions or the possible effects on the nation’s political system–or both.’ and Whatever the effect(s) you discuss, consider also the following question: Is this healthy for American democracy? Why or why not?’

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Political Science, Theology

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Politics/Law/Government

Keywords: political science, religion, religious switching, paper, response

Paper Topic: Your Reflections on Religion and Politics

David Campbell
Author

University of Notre Dame
Institution

Assignment
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

The purpose of this paper is to garner student’s attitudes about religion and it’s role in politics. Questions include: ‘Have your beliefs about religion–which includes a belief in something in place of religion–affected your political views? If so, how? If not, why not?’ and ‘Do you think voters should draw on their religious beliefs in forming their political opinions? Why or why not?’ This paper is a personal response where the responder does not need to cite sources.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Political Science

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Politics/Law/Government

Keywords: paper, political science, religion, voting,

Place Profile

Rachel Lindsey
Author

Saint Louis University
Institution

Assignment
Resource Type

2020
Date Published

Description:

This is the second of a three-part series of “Snowball Essays” designed to guide students from reflection on race and religion in their own personal experience (Snowball Essay #1 is a Positionality Essay) to sustained reflection on race and religion in American life, history, and culture. I present this as a “process essay” that builds on course readings and incorporates distinct methodologies and forms of evidence.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Theology

Religious Traditions: Buddhism, Catholic, Hinduism, Indigenous, Islam, Judaism, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords:

Political Science 30028: Religion in American Politics

David Campell
Author

University of Notre Dame
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2011
Date Published

Description:

How can America be religiously devout, religiously diverse, and religiously tolerant? When we look at other nations, or even this nation at other periods in history, religious differences have led to discord and even bloodshed. And yet the United States has a remarkably high level of religious tolerance. Indeed, this tolerance is even more remarkable in light of the divisive role religion plays in our politics. This course will examine the ways in which religion is interwoven into American politics. Then it will turn to trying to solve the puzzle of America’s religious pluralism—if religion is so politically divisive, why are Americans so accepting of (most) religions other than their own? What explains the exceptions?

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Political Science, Sociology

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Race/Ethnicity

Keywords: political science, religion, tolerance, American, church and state, religious right, race, diversity

Political Science 4070: Religion and American Politics

Laura Olson
Author

Clemson University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2014
Date Published

Description:

This course is designed to examine and critically analyze the nature of the relationship between religion and various aspects of politics in the United States. We analyze how religion affects American politics among the masses and in the courts, and we ask why religion and politics are so thoroughly interwoven in the United States by examining the religion-politics relationship in historical and theoretical perspective. In doing so, we will encounter a range of themes that are relevant to the study of American politics.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Political Science

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Politics/Law/Government

Keywords: political science, religion, policy, separation, America, religiosity, politics, social movements

Political Science/Religion 325: Religion and Politics in America

Chris Gilbert
Author

Gustavus Adolphus College
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2013
Date Published

Description:

This course examines the political impact of religion in the United States, both historically and today. The phrase “separation of church and state” is one (but not the only) characterization of the official relationship between U.S. governmental institutions and religious institutions; it does not begin to cover the myriad connections found between organized religion and government at all levels and in all historical periods of American society. The primary goals are first, to understand how the interrelationships between religion and politics in the United States have developed; and second, to explore how religion in various forms continues to affect American public life, the workings of key political and social institutions, and the lives of citizens.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course, Seminar

Discipline: Religious Studies, Political Science

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Islam, Judaism, Protestant

Evangelicalism, Latter Day Saints

Topics: Politics/Law/Government, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords: political science, religion, race, politics, policy, activism, evangelicals, judaism, mormon, culture

Politics of African American Religion in Historical Perspective

Nicole Myers Turner
Author

Virginia Commonwealth University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2017
Date Published

Description:

This course explores the history of African American religious communities from the colonial times to the present. It explores the organization and politics of these institutions and how the
various historical forces and major events of slavery, emancipation, migration, urbanization, racism, race consciousness, gender and class have shaped black religious communities across the centuries. It uses a diverse grouping of primary and secondary sources and experiential learning activities to further these aims. Course materials include scholarly monographs, chapters and articles, primary accounts of religious life and records of religious organizations. Students will come away from the course with an enhanced sense of the complexities of black religious life and the evolution of black religions as central social and political agents in black life and the black freedom struggle.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, History

Africana Studies

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Class/Power, Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Politics/Law/Government, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords:

POS 386: Religion and Politics in the United States

Mark Brewer
Author

University of Maine
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2012
Date Published

Description:

Many of you are probably familiar with the old saying that it is impolite to discuss religion or politics with strangers and dangerous to do so with friends. We are going to purposely ignore this advice, and spend the entire semester talking about these two subjects, devoting particular attention to how religion and politics intersect in the United States. Not long ago it was widely assumed that modernization would eventually eliminate religion as a significant force in American society. As recently as the 1970s, conventional wisdom held that religion no longer mattered in American politics. These claims have proven to be completely and utterly wrong. The United States is and always has been a religious society. Along the same lines, religion has historically played a substantial role in American politics, and continues to do so today. This interaction between religion and politics will be the focus of this course. Over the course of this semester students will be expected to engage in a thoughtful and critical examination of the many different ways that religion affects American politics, and also ways in which politics affects matters of religion. 0

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Political Science

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Protestant

Church of Jesus Christ, Latter Day Saints

Topics: Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords: religion, political science, government, policy, race, African American, abortion, abolition, behavior, catholic, protestant

Praying for a Cure? Religion, Health, and Healing in America

Wendy Cadge
Author

Brandeis University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2007
Date Published

Description:

Does spirituality promote health as the cover of Time magazine asks? Should pharmacists be required to dispense birth control when they feel it conflicts with their religious beliefs? What have scientists learned about the influence of prayers on health? What is it like to be a hospital chaplain? Does religion or spirituality influence the work of doctors and nurses? What do Muslim community healthcare organizations do? How do leaders of local churches, synagogues, mosques and temples respond to the health needs of their congregants? This seminar investigates these questions and others by looking at the relationship between religion, health, and healing in the contemporary United States. We explore how a wide range of religious and medical organizations understand these relationships and focus specifically on contemporary tensions between religious and medical beliefs. Course materials include academic and popular writings, films and guest speakers.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Political Science, Sociology

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics: He​alth/Death

Keywords: health, religion, praying, chaplin, relationship, political science, sociology, america

Progressive Religion in America

Grace Yukich
Author

Quinnipiac University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2016
Date Published

Description:

Many of the most important movements for social change in American history—from the abolition of slavery to civil rights to women’s rights—have been fueled in part by progressive religion. In this course, we will examine religion from a social scientific perspective. Using sociological research, we will address questions like: What do we mean we talk about “religion”? What counts as “progressive religion” and who decides? How does “progressive religion” differ from “conservative religion”? Does being part of a marginalized religious tradition make it more likely that you will fight for progressive causes? How do race, class, and gender shape people’s approaches to progressive religion? How does progressive religion shape politics, gender & sexuality, and other parts of society? We will explore these questions by focusing on a wide array of religious traditions and contemporary topics.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Sociology

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Class/Power, Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords:

Quakers Responses to the Holocaust

David Watt
Author

Haverford College
Institution

Assignment
Resource Type

2020
Date Published

Description:

In the 1930s and 1940s, Quakers engaged in a number of remarkable—and controversial—activities that were intended to provide assistance to people who were being persecuted by the Nazis. Those actions were criticized by some US citizens (who thought that Quakers were giving unwitting aid to the Nazis) and also derided by Nazis such as Joseph Goebbels (who thought that Quakers were demonstrating a complete lack of awareness about how the world really works.) Nevertheless, Quakers’ actions did end up saving some lives. Students in this course will examine what Quakers accomplished—and failed to accomplish—in the 1930s and 1940s. The course is not designed as a venue in which to decide, once and for all, which of the Quakers’ actions were wise and which were foolish. The course is meant, rather, to offer students an opportunity to reflect on the ethical questions with which Quakers wrestled and an invitation to compare those questions with the ones they face themselves. Special attention will be paid the connections between Quakers’ responses to the Holocaust and Quakers’ religious beliefs and practices.0

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Other

Peace, Justice, and Human Rights

Religious Traditions: Protestant

Topics:

Keywords:

Race and Religion Course – Wells-Oghoghomeh

Alexis Wells-Oghoghomeh
Author

Vanderbilt University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2020
Date Published

Description:

What does it mean to be “American?” Since their inception, America and American identities have been constituted through ever-evolving religious and racial imaginaries, conflicts, and lineages—forging ideological stances, symbols, and myths that rival traditional “religions.”  Using a historical approach, this course explores the racial and religious imperatives encapsulated within concepts of “Americanness” and the racial and religious ideas that define the discursive, historical, and sociopolitical boundaries of American identities.  In addition to examining how claims to American identities have altered the religiosity of historically-marginalized racial “Others,” we will also consider the ways racial concepts have resembled and drawn upon religious forms in their operations in America.  Finally, we will discuss how peoples’ responses to concepts of race and religion challenge, nuance, and expand notions of America and the American.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course, Graduate Course, Online

Discipline: Religious Studies, History

Religious Traditions:

Topics:

Keywords: Race in America, Religion in America, Race and Religion

Race and Religion in America

Alexis Wells-Oghoghomeh
Author

Vanderbilt University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2019
Date Published

Description:

What does it mean to be “American?” Since their inception, America and American identities have been constituted through ever-evolving religious and racial imaginaries, conflicts, and lineages—forging ideological stances, symbols, and myths that rival traditional “religions.” Using a historical approach, this course explores the racial and religious imperatives encapsulated within concepts of “Americanness” and the racial and religious ideas that define the discursive, historical, and sociopolitical boundaries of American identities. In addition to examining how claims to American identities have altered the religiosity of historically marginalized racial “Others,” we will also consider the ways racial concepts have resembled and drawn upon religious forms in their operations in America. Finally, we will discuss how peoples’ responses to racial and religious imperatives challenge, nuance, and expand concepts of America and the American.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course, Graduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, American Studies, History

Interdisciplinary

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Immigration/Refugees, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords: thematic

Race and Religious Faith

Gerardo Marti
Author

Davidson College
Institution


Resource Type

2011
Date Published

Description:

This seminar pursues sociological analysis at the intersection of race-ethnicity and religion. Our focus in this class centers on American congregational communities (whether it be church, temple, or mosque)— especially in relation to processes of immigration and transnationalism. Our class begins with a broad discussion of Will Herberg’s classic discussion on the American assimilation of religious groups and the formation of the historic Black Church in America. The class continues with an analysis of religion and migration at the turn of the 20th Century. The transformations of both black churches and non-native, ethnic churches throughout the mid-century will quickly culminate into an examination of the relations between race-ethnicity, religion, and broader civic society today. The course ends with a look at the rare achievement of multi-ethnic/multi-racial religious communities.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Political Science, Sociology

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Judaism, Protestant

Topics: Race/Ethnicity

Keywords: race, religion, immigration, sociology, racial identity, American religion,

Race, Ethnicity, and Religion

Kristy Nabhan-Warren
Author

Augustana College
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2006
Date Published

Description:

We will spend the next ten weeks together examining some the ways in which race, ethnicity, and religion overlap and inform one another within African American communities. But before we begin our journey of exploration, we need to ask ourselves, what do these terms and concepts mean (both to African Americans as well as others) and how have they been used in the United States? According to social theorists Michael Omi and Howard Winant, “Racial categories and the meanings of race are given concrete expression by the specific social relations and historical context in which they are embedded.” In this course, we will explore how “racial categories” and the “meanings of race” have been used to define African Americans and also how African Americans determine racial categories for themselves and others. In this course we will be looking at the multiple ways in which race, ethnicity, and religious identities overlap for African Americans, and how African American men, women, and children negotiate their way through the complex meanings that are inscribed on them and to those that they ascribe to themselves.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies

Religious Traditions: Catholic, General Comparative Traditions, Islam, Protestant

Topics: Class/Power, Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords:

Race, Religion, and Donald J. Trump Syllabus

Gerardo Martí
Author

Davidson College
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2020
Date Published

Description:

Course Description & Student Outcomes: The purpose of this course is to gain appreciation for sociological analysis at the intersection of race-ethnicity and religion through the phenomenon of Donald J. Trump’s election as the 45th president of the United States.  Let me be clear: the course is not an opportunity for the professor and students to air their opinions, and we will not be focused on Trump’s personality. Instead, the class constitutes a careful exploration centering on racial and religious dynamics as they touch on the historical context of the Trump presidency—including our discernment of significance in his positions, policies, political appointments, and particular public statements (and those of his surrogates/supporters/representatives).  The course is analytical, historical, and empirically grounded in observable patterns. <p class=”MsoNormal” style=”margin: 0in 0in 0.0001pt; font-size: medium; font-family: ‘Times New Roman’,0

Institution Type: Public College or University, Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course, Online, Seminar

Discipline: History, Sociology

Religious Traditions: Protestant

Topics:

Keywords: history, sociology, race, class, religion, politics, power, inequality, Donald Trump, national identity, America

Religion & Colonialism

Justine Howe
Author

Case Western Reserve University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2017
Date Published

Description:

What happens to religious beliefs and practices in sites of colonial contact? How have colonial encounters shaped our knowledge of religion? These two questions will frame our semester-long inquiry into colonial religious practices and the production of knowledge about religion in colonial settings. Along the way, we will pay close attention to how religion relates to other sites of social power and organization, namely race, gender, and nation. This course focuses on various empires as they were/are constituted in Asia, Africa, and North America. Through these case studies, we will explore the institutions, texts, practices, and material cultures through which varying historical actors created and negotiated the religious in the context of modern empires. To do so, we will focus our attention on primary sources alongside secondary analysis by modern scholars.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course, Graduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, History

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Class/Power, Empire/Foreign Policy/Globalism, Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords:

Religion & Gender and Race in the 2020 Political Landscape


Author

IUPUI
Institution

Video
Resource Type

2020
Date Published

Description:

100 years after the ratification of the 19th amendment and in this moment of racial reckoning, the American political climate is still dominated by the unequal representation of women, especially women of color, in local, state, and electoral politics. For the inaugural session of “Religion &’, we will explore the intersection of gender, race, politics, and the role of religion. Specifically, this panel will analyze the role that religious traditions play in sustaining or mitigating new models of engagement, political formation, and social change. How do current works on the intersection of gender, race, religion, and political participation help us frame and anticipate this current electoral season? Furthermore, have our theoretical focus on certain groups, like white Evangelicals, and insistence on traditional constructions of topics, like climate change from the perspective of nation-states and the corporate elite, adversely impacted our ability to tell a compelling story of the American religious landscape and its resistances to the current moment? How might we tell a more comprehensive story of the American electorate and its relationship to gender, race, religion, and belonging?

Institution Type:

Class Type:

Discipline:

Religious Traditions:

Topics: Class/Power, Family/Children/Reproduction, Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Immigration/Refugees, Politics/Law/Government, Race/Ethnicity, Nationalism/War/Civil Religion

Keywords: Gender, Race, Politics

Religion and American Culture

Beth S. Wenger
Author

University of Pennsylvania
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

1999
Date Published

Description:

This course examines how and in whose interests American concepts of and about “religion” have been produced. What cultural sites (the courts, the media, schools, the academy) are most influential in producing ideas about religion-in-general, or about particular kinds of religion? Who has the power to determine what groups are recognized as legitimate and therefore constitutionally protected religions? What is imagined to be the appropriate scope of religion’s impact in public life—is it primarily a private concern, or is it relevant to public interests? What relationship do such concepts of religion have with the politics of race, class, gender, and colonialism?

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Graduate Course, Seminar

Discipline: Religious Studies, American Studies, English

Religious Traditions: Islam

Topics: Popular Culture/Media/Music/Sports, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords: religious freedom, theory of religion

Religion and American Culture

James Treat
Author

University of New Mexico
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

1999
Date Published

Description:

This interdisciplinary graduate seminar explores the role of religion in American culture and of religious studies in American culture studies. It is designed for students enrolled in the American Studies graduate program or the Religious Studies concentration of the Philosophy graduate program, and for graduate students affiliated with other departments in the humanities or social sciences who are working on projects involving American and/or religious topics.

The course is organized in two parts, historical and thematic. Part I takes a historical approach to the study of American religion; it provides students with a brief introduction to American religious studies, an essential background in American religious history, and a basic understanding of recent debates over American religious historiography. Part II takes a thematic approach to the study of American religion; students explore the role of religion in American culture, and of religious studies in American culture studies, by reading representative scholarship selected in light of the area rubrics of the American Studies graduate program: Gender Studies; Race, Class and Ethnicity; Southwest Studies; Popular Culture; Environment, Science and Technology. Throughout the semester, we attempt to evaluate the significance of religion as descriptive marker and as analytical category in the scholarship of American culture studies.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Graduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, American Studies, Area Studies, History

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Popular Culture/Media/Music/Sports, Race/Ethnicity, Science/Technology/Environment

Keywords: the southwest,

Religion and American Culture

Matthew A. Sutton
Author

Washington State University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2009
Date Published

Description:

This course surveys the history of American religions from pre-contact times to the present, focusing on the evolution of religious faiths as varying groups came into contact with one another. In particular, the course will analyze how steady immigration and limited governmental intrusion produced a diverse and pluralistic culture that places tremendous value on religious beliefs. In addition, the course will focus specifically on the ways in which Americans have used religion to shape their communities, their cultures, and their nation. Religion has never been simply about belief; it is always about actions as well. As a result, this course will place heavy emphasis on “lived” religion, or religion “on the ground.”

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, History

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions, New Religious Movements, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics: Class/Power, Family/Children/Reproduction, Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Immigration/Refugees, Politics/Law/Government, Popular Culture/Media/Music/Sports, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Nationalism/War/Civil Religion

Keywords:

Religion and American Culture

Randall Stephens
Author

Eastern Nazarene College
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2009
Date Published

Description:

This readings seminar offers history majors and non-majors a broad knowledge of religion and American culture from the pre-colonial period to the present. Special attention will be given to the work of historians, filmmakers, religious studies scholars, anthropologists, and sociologists who grapple with the complexities of American religious life. This course will pay close attention to the wide-ranging religious diversity of America—from 19th century Lakota spiritualism to 20th century Catholic devotion; from modern serpent-handling Appalachian pentecostals to covenant-making early American Puritans. Other topics to be covered include: the religious dimensions of gender and sexuality, race and religion, the development of a distinctively American theology, and the recent fusion of religion and politics.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course, Seminar

Discipline: Religious Studies, History

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions, Indigenous, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics: Business/Capitalism/Labor, Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Politics/Law/Government, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Race/Ethnicity, Nationalism/War/Civil Religion, Theology/Liturgy

Keywords:

Religion and American Politics: 1600-Present

Heather Curtis
Author

Tufts University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2011
Date Published

Description:

“In God we Trust,” “One Nation Under God,” “God Bless America,”: phrases like these alert us to the on-going influence of religion in American public life. This course explores the role of religion in shaping American civic engagement and political activity from the 17thcentury to the present, aiming to put contemporary events in broader historical context. Key topics and themes include: the relationship between church and state in the colonial period; faith and the founders; religion and social activism in the antebellum era (especially anti-slavery and women’s rights); religion, race and civil rights; religious “outsiders” and American politics (particularly Mormons, Catholics, and Muslims); spirituality and social protest in the 20th century (pacifism; feminism; and economic reform); the rise of the religious right; religion and American politics post-9/11; and the 2008 presidential election.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, American Studies, History

Religious Traditions: Catholic, General Comparative Traditions, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics: Business/Capitalism/Labor, Empire/Foreign Policy/Globalism, Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Politics/Law/Government, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Race/Ethnicity, Nationalism/War/Civil Religion

Keywords: religious freedom

Religion and American Politics: Annotated Bibliography Project

Laura Olson
Author

Clemson University
Institution

Assignment
Resource Type

2014
Date Published

Description:

You will complete an annotated bibliography for the topic you have chosen to study. Find at least ten sources (books, articles, news stories, opinion pieces, etc.) that relate directly to the topic you are studying. For each source, provide an accurate bibliographical citation and a few sentences summarizing the information contained in the source.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Political Science

Religious Traditions:

Topics:

Keywords: political science, religion, annotated bibliography

Religion and American Public Schools

Khyati Y. Joshi
Author

Fairleigh-Dickinson University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2004
Date Published

Description:

This course will investigate the relationship between religion and public education in the United States with a focus on issues affecting classroom practice, curriculum, and pedagogy. Based in large part on legal decisions in the area and relying primarily on a discussion format, it will be a blend of three elements: a brief examination of the historic relationship of religion and education in the United States; an analysis of historic and current legal and public policy materials related to that relationship; and an exploration of ways of balancing the relationship in curricula so as to respect the religious rights and responsibilities of teachers, administrators, students, parents, and the educational system in which they encounter each other.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Graduate Course, Seminar

Discipline: Religious Studies, Other

Education

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions, Islam, Protestant

Topics: Family/Children/Reproduction, Politics/Law/Government, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Science/Technology/Environment

Keywords: religious freedom

Religion and Culture in Early New England

Adrian Chastain Weimer
Author

Providence College
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2012
Date Published

Description:

The stories of the native Northeast, Protestant New England, and Catholic immigration are often told as separate or competing narratives. What are the webs of relationships, both real and imagined, that help us to understand the rich history of religion in early New England as an interconnected story? How is “New England” itself an unstable category, and how does the self-understanding of various groups change over time? Examining local developments alongside Atlantic world and imperial contexts, we inquire how everyday life in New England was interconnected with broader cultural, social, intellectual, and religious movements. In addition to native Americans, puritans, Baptists, Quakers, Huguenots, and French and Irish Catholics, we will also look at the significance of New England for early Mormonism, as well as the long history of Jews and Africans in the region. Special attention will be given to issues of migration, varieties of cultural prejudice and tolerance, supernaturalism, Protestant-Catholic relations, social reform, and the political and devotional decisions various groups faced as they negotiated a place on the religious landscape.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Area Studies, History

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Indigenous, Other Traditions, Protestant

Topics: Empire/Foreign Policy/Globalism, Immigration/Refugees, Politics/Law/Government, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Race/Ethnicity, Region/Urban/Rural

Keywords:

Religion and Culture in Post-Civil Rights Black America

Josef Sorett
Author

Columbia University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

This is an advanced-level seminar on African American religion and culture open to graduate students, and advanced undergraduates with prior background in the subject. More specifically, this course centers its queries around developments during the period commonly referred to as the “post-Civil Rights era,” (but which has also often been framed through the related rhetorics of “postmodern,” “postcolonial” and “post-Soul”). To this end, readings and discussions will explore black culture—both within formal religious traditions, but also more broadly as they are revealed in the arts, politics and popular culture—during the latter half of the twentieth century. Additionally, specific attention will be paid to major themes, challenges, questions and quandaries that have shaped the inter-disciplinary study of African American religion in recent years.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course, Graduate Course, Seminar

Discipline: Religious Studies, American Studies

Africana Studies

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Politics/Law/Government, Popular Culture/Media/Music/Sports, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords:

Religion and Gender

The Association of Religion Data Archives
Author

IUPUI
Institution

Assignment
Resource Type

2020
Date Published

Description:

The ARDA Lesson Plans integrate content from the ARDA and other sources into teachable units. Each lesson has specific learning objectives, a host of relevant readings from which to choose, learning activities to utilize in class, and assessment tools to gauge students learning on the topic. Lesson plans contain links to the ARDA learning resources to make it easy for educators to use the ARDA in their teaching. The lessons are designed for courses in a wide range of disciplines, including history, political science, psychology, religious studies, and sociology. This assignment was created for the Association of Religion Data Archives.

Institution Type: Community College, Public College or University, Private College or University, Seminary

Class Type: Intro, Undergraduate Course, Graduate Course, Online, Seminar

Discipline: Religious Studies, Sociology

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Class/Power, Family/Children/Reproduction, Gender/Women/ Sexuality

Keywords: gender, religion, sociology, comparative, research, theory

Religion and Globalization

The Association of Religion Data Archives
Author

IUPUI
Institution

Assignment
Resource Type

2020
Date Published

Description: The ARDA Lesson Plans integrate content from the ARDA and other sources into teachable units. Each lesson has specific learning objectives, a host of relevant readings from which to choose, learning activities to utilize in class, and assessment tools to gauge students learning on the topic. Lesson plans contain links to the ARDA learning resources to make it easy for educators to use the ARDA in their teaching. The lessons are designed for courses in a wide range of disciplines, including history, political science, psychology, religious studies, and sociology. This assignment was created for the Association of Religion Data Archives.

Institution Type: k-12 | Community College | Public College or University | Private College or University | Seminary

Class Type: Intro | Undergraduate Course | Graduate Course | Online | hybrid | Seminar

Discipline: Religious Studies | american_studies | Political Science | Sociology

Religious Traditions: atheism/agnosticism/skepticism | general_comparative_traditions | New Religious Movements

Topics:

Keywords: globalization, religion, sociology, United States, research

Religion and Health

The Association of Religion Data Archives
Author

IUPUI
Institution

Assignment
Resource Type

2020
Date Published

Description:

The ARDA Lesson Plans integrate content from the ARDA and other sources into teachable units. Each lesson has specific learning objectives, a host of relevant readings from which to choose, learning activities to utilize in class, and assessment tools to gauge students learning on the topic. Lesson plans contain links to the ARDA learning resources to make it easy for educators to use the ARDA in their teaching. The lessons are designed for courses in a wide range of disciplines, including history, political science, psychology, religious studies, and sociology. This assignment was created for the Association of Religion Data Archives.

Institution Type: Community College, Public College or University, Private College or University, Seminary

Class Type: Intro, Undergraduate Course, Graduate Course, Online, Seminar

Discipline: Religious Studies, Sociology

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: He​alth/Death

Keywords: health, religion, sociology, research

Religion and Humanitarianism in America

Rosemary R. Corbett
Author

Bard College
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

This class will look at the history of modern humanitarianism—an activity that is now a multimillion dollar industry and that the U.S. funds more than any other country in the world—and its origins in charity, philanthropy, and missions. By interspersing case studies of humanitarian endeavors with theoretical investigations into the nature of such work, we will explore the evolving relationships between private religious humanitarian groups and more public actors, forces, and institutions such as nation-states, international law, and the market. Our goals will be to dig past the fiction that humanitarianism is ever impartial (a seemingly necessary fiction that allows many institutions to do their work in conflict areas) to uncover the political dynamics of various humanitarian endeavors. In so doing, we will seek to understand how such work and the narratives we tell about it shapes our notions of the proper roles of religious groups and government, as well as how religious groups represent (and contest) U.S. power in the world.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course, Seminar

Discipline: Religious Studies

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Business/Capitalism/Labor, Class/Power, Politics/Law/Government

Keywords:

Religion and Nature in America

Brett Grainger
Author

Villanova University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2017
Date Published

Description:

This course offers a survey of American religions from colonial times to the present, using the theme of “nature” and the “natural.” Using methods and theories from the academic study of religion, we will explore how American religions have made meaning out of their encounters with non-human nature, and in turn, how natural environments have shaped religious belief and practice. Rather than cover every religious movement in American history (a fool’s errand), we will look at a series of case studies that open up recurrent themes, issues, and tensions in American religious history.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, American Studies

Interdisciplinary

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions, New Religious Movements

Topics: Science/Technology/Environment

Keywords: thematic, cosmology, sacred space

Religion and Non-Religion Syllabus

Gerardo Martí
Author

Davidson College
Institution

Assignment
Resource Type

2019
Date Published

Description:

Course Description & Student Outcomes: Religion exists in a social context, and always is shaped by and shapes its social context. Furthermore, religion itself is always (at least in part) a socially constituted reality–that is, its content and structure are always formed, at least partially, out of the “stuff” of the socio-cultural world (language, symbols, groups, norms, interactions, resources, organizations, etc.). The sociology of religion pursues an understanding of both the “social-ness'” of religion itself and the mutually influencing interactions between religion and its social environment. We will analyze religious beliefs, practices, and organizations from a sociological perspective, with a primary focus on religion in contemporary American society. <p class=”MsoNormal” style=”margin: 0in 0in0

Institution Type: Public College or University, Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course, Graduate Course, Online, Seminar

Discipline: Religious Studies, Sociology

Religious Traditions: Protestant

Topics:

Keywords: sociology, sociology of religion, theory

Religion and Philanthropy

David P. King
Author

Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2015
Date Published

Description:

This course explores three relationships between people’s religious traditions and their philanthropic ideas and activities: 1) how diverse religious traditions have shaped distinctive
philanthropic practices, 2) how political, economic and social forces have structured religious philanthropy, and 3) how competing visions of good lives and a good society have played out in
the give and take of religious philanthropy. In examining the normative models of giving and service through a variety of religious traditions, we will analyze how religious narratives,
practices, teachings and authorities have shaped people’s generosity and humanitarianism. In studying religious philanthropy in particular historical contexts, we will explore how religious
philanthropy has been influenced by secular states and market economies, transforming religious traditions and communities along the way. In observing the tensions between the purposes of givers and takers, we will locate religious philanthropy in the world of social action so as to assess claims about the uniquely selfless, altruistic or civic nature of religious philanthropy. The primary focus is cultural and historical, but students will also explore through research and application how the issues discussed in class affect individuals, institutions, and civil society in contemporary contexts.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Graduate Course, Seminar

Discipline: Religious Studies, Other

Philanthropic Studies

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Empire/Foreign Policy/Globalism, Politics/Law/Government

Keywords: charity

Religion and Politics

The Association of Religion Data Archives
Author

IUPUI
Institution

Assignment
Resource Type

2020
Date Published

Description:

The ARDA Lesson Plans integrate content from the ARDA and other sources into teachable units. Each lesson has specific learning objectives, a host of relevant readings from which to choose, learning activities to utilize in class, and assessment tools to gauge students learning on the topic. Lesson plans contain links to the ARDA learning resources to make it easy for educators to use the ARDA in their teaching. The lessons are designed for courses in a wide range of disciplines, including history, political science, psychology, religious studies, and sociology. This assignment was created for the Association of Religion Data Archives.0

Institution Type: Community College, Public College or University, Private College or University, Seminary

Class Type: Intro, Undergraduate Course, Graduate Course, Online, Seminar

Discipline: Religious Studies, Political Science, Sociology

Religious Traditions: New Religious Movements

Topics: Politics/Law/Government

Keywords: politics, religion, political science, sociology, United States, research

Religion and Popular Culture

Charles Brown
Author

Albright College
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2009
Date Published

Description:

We will begin by defining religion and popular culture and then move on to answer such questions as: How do popular culture and the mass media affect religion? Conversely, how does religion affect our popular culture and mass media? What are we to think of Christian forms of commercial entertainment like “religious rock music,” “Christian hip-hop,” and “Christian romance novels” or motion pictures? Several critics have pointed out that the industry that produces these things is nothing more than an attempt to make money off of religion. Others, however, feel that this industry provides an important role in maintaining and reinforcing religious identity by giving people what they want: religious commercial entertainment. This course is designed to provide an opportunity for students to explore the role religion plays in creating and maintaining culture through popular cultural expressions such as music, television, motion pictures, sports, and fashion. We will analyze how popular culture affects religion and how religion, in turn, affects popular culture and society.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Sociology

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics: Popular Culture/Media/Music/Sports, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars

Keywords: popular culture, sociology, religion, television, sports, fashion, rock

Religion and Race Identity

The Association of Religion Data Archives
Author

IUPUI
Institution

Assignment
Resource Type

2020
Date Published

Description:

The ARDA Lesson Plans integrate content from the ARDA and other sources into teachable units. Each lesson has specific learning objectives, a host of relevant readings from which to choose, learning activities to utilize in class, and assessment tools to gauge students learning on the topic. Lesson plans contain links to the ARDA learning resources to make it easy for educators to use the ARDA in their teaching. The lessons are designed for courses in a wide range of disciplines, including history, political science, psychology, religious studies, and sociology. This assignment was created for the Association of Religion Data Archives.

Institution Type: Community College, Public College or University, Private College or University, Seminary

Class Type: Intro, Undergraduate Course, Graduate Course, Online, Seminar

Discipline: Religious Studies, Political Science, Sociology

Religious Traditions: Buddhism, Catholic, Hinduism, Indigenous, Islam, Judaism, New Religious Movements, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics: Class/Power, Empire/Foreign Policy/Globalism, Immigration/Refugees, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords: race, religion, sociology, political science, organizational, ethnicity

Religion and Reproductive Politics in the United States

Samira Mehta
Author

University of Colorado, Boulder
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2019
Date Published

Description:

Religion and Reproductive Politics in the United States focuses primarily on how Protestant, Catholic, and Jewish conversations about sexuality and reproduction have shaped access to and attitudes towards reproductive health in the US over the course of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Jews and Catholics provide an excellent way to think about how religious law/theology and religious practice/community needs diverge. Attention to Jewish thought on contraception, abortion, and reproduction helps to denaturalize any number of Christian assumptions about reproductive ethics that dominate the discourse in the US. While the course focuses on the three religious groups who were allowed to be policy influencers in the US political debate, the course allows students space to consider how other religious groups (Hindu, Muslim, Buddhist, Indigenous) have interacted with and been affected by the dominant religious voices. By comparing the role of religion in US debates about reproduction to the Israeli version of those conversations, students will come to understand how these debates play out in another soil where the religious commitments are in some ways more embedded but also much more liberal on issues like abortion.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Women's Studies, Other

Jewish Studies

Religious Traditions: Catholic, General Comparative Traditions, Judaism, Protestant

Topics: Family/Children/Reproduction, Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Politics/Law/Government, Popular Culture/Media/Music/Sports, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars

Keywords:

Religion and Science

The Association of Religion Data Archives
Author

IUPUI
Institution

Assignment
Resource Type

2020
Date Published

Description:

The ARDA Lesson Plans integrate content from the ARDA and other sources into teachable units. Each lesson has specific learning objectives, a host of relevant readings from which to choose, learning activities to utilize in class, and assessment tools to gauge students learning on the topic. Lesson plans contain links to the ARDA learning resources to make it easy for educators to use the ARDA in their teaching. The lessons are designed for courses in a wide range of disciplines, including history, political science, psychology, religious studies, and sociology. This assignment was created for the Association of Religion Data Archives.

Institution Type: Community College, Public College or University, Private College or University, Seminary

Class Type: Intro, Undergraduate Course, Graduate Course, Online, Seminar

Discipline: Religious Studies, Political Science, Sociology, Theology

Religious Traditions: New Religious Movements

Topics: Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Science/Technology/Environment

Keywords: science, religion, comparative, United States, research, theology

Religion and Sexuality

The Association of Religion Data Archives
Author

IUPUI
Institution

Assignment
Resource Type

2020
Date Published

Description:

The ARDA Lesson Plans integrate content from the ARDA and other sources into teachable units. Each lesson has specific learning objectives, a host of relevant readings from which to choose, learning activities to utilize in class, and assessment tools to gauge students learning on the topic. Lesson plans contain links to the ARDA learning resources to make it easy for educators to use the ARDA in their teaching. The lessons are designed for courses in a wide range of disciplines, including history, political science, psychology, religious studies, and sociology. This assignment was created for the Association of Religion Data Archives.

Institution Type: Community College, Public College or University, Private College or University, Seminary

Class Type: Intro, Undergraduate Course, Graduate Course, Online, Seminar

Discipline: Religious Studies, Political Science, Sociology

Religious Traditions: New Religious Movements

Topics: Family/Children/Reproduction, Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Politics/Law/Government

Keywords: sexuality, religion, sociology, political science, comparative, United States, research

Religion and Sexuality in America

Kathryn Lofton
Author

Yale University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2009
Date Published

Description:

This course seeks to answer one question: What is the sexuality of American religion? Through a series of case studies and theoretical ruminations, we will explore the relationship between ideas about sex and ideas about religion, as well as sexual practices and religious practices. The purpose of this course is to prepare you not only for upper-level work on the subjects of sexuality, religion, or American culture, but also to encourage a revamping of presumptive norms as well as an abiding suspicion of pat dichotomies.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Intro, Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, American Studies, History

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions, New Religious Movements, Other Christianities

Topics: Family/Children/Reproduction, Gender/Women/ Sexuality, He​alth/Death

Keywords: homosexuality, marriage

Religion and Social Class

The Association of Religion Data Archives
Author

IUPUI
Institution

Assignment
Resource Type

2020
Date Published

Description:

The ARDA Lesson Plans integrate content from the ARDA and other sources into teachable units. Each lesson has specific learning objectives, a host of relevant readings from which to choose, learning activities to utilize in class, and assessment tools to gauge students learning on the topic. Lesson plans contain links to the ARDA learning resources to make it easy for educators to use the ARDA in their teaching. The lessons are designed for courses in a wide range of disciplines, including history, political science, psychology, religious studies, and sociology. This assignment was created for the Association of Religion Data Archives.

Institution Type: Community College, Public College or University, Private College or University, Seminary

Class Type: Intro, Undergraduate Course, Graduate Course, Online, Seminar

Discipline: Religious Studies, Political Science, Sociology

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Business/Capitalism/Labor, Class/Power

Keywords: social, class, religion, social class, comparative, research

Religion and Social Movements

The Association of Religion Data Archives
Author

IUPUI
Institution

Assignment
Resource Type

2020
Date Published

Description:

The ARDA Lesson Plans integrate content from the ARDA and other sources into teachable units. Each lesson has specific learning objectives, a host of relevant readings from which to choose, learning activities to utilize in class, and assessment tools to gauge students learning on the topic. Lesson plans contain links to the ARDA learning resources to make it easy for educators to use the ARDA in their teaching. The lessons are designed for courses in a wide range of disciplines, including history, political science, psychology, religious studies, and sociology. This assignment was created for the Association of Religion Data Archives.

Institution Type: Community College, Public College or University, Private College or University, Seminary

Class Type: Intro, Undergraduate Course, Graduate Course, Online, Seminar

Discipline: Religious Studies, Political Science, Sociology

Religious Traditions: New Religious Movements

Topics: Class/Power, Family/Children/Reproduction, Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Popular Culture/Media/Music/Sports, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords: social movements, movements, sociology, research, religion, political science

Religion and Society

Fay Botham
Author

University of Iowa
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2011
Date Published

Description:

This course examines religion and American society by focusing on marriage law in American history, and the roles that Christianity played therein. American marriage law involves Christian beliefs about sexual morality and gender, as well as about natural and divine law. Some people thus view the right to marry as a religious right, while others perceive it as a secular (non-religious)right. Structuring this course around the topic of marriage allows us to consider specific questions in constitutional law, and how Christian beliefs shape larger societal views on morality, gender and sexuality. We will reflect on whether or not the influence of Christian beliefs on American marriage laws in effect establishes religion-based laws in contravention of the First Amendment promise to make no law establishing a particular religion.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics: Family/Children/Reproduction, Politics/Law/Government, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords: marriage

Religion and Society

Christopher Ellison
Author

University of Texas, San Antonio
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2013
Date Published

Description:

In this course, we will examine the dominant theories of religion and look at the ways in which sociologists use multiple types of empirical data –quantitative and qualitative– to study religion as a social institution. The first portion of the course will focus squarely on the debate between “old” and “new” paradigms in the sociology of religion. Among other specific topics, we will learn about patterns of religious affiliation, and the reasons for the growth and decline of particular religious groups and communities, as well as the varied factors that influence individual religious decision making. The second segment of the course will explore religious differentials in a number of important outcomes, ranging from pro-social behavior to health to family life, and other important areas of social life. In the third and final portion of the course, we will turn our attention to the important role that religion is playing in defining and responding to the AIDS crisis in sub-Saharan Africa.

Institution Type: Public College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, Sociology

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Immigration/Refugees, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords: religion, society, sociology, economics, AIDS, education, stratification, family life, sexuality, United States, Africa

Religion and Society in America

Clarence Hardy
Author

Dartmouth College
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2004
Date Published

Description:

This course focuses on important currents in US religious history and culture. While the approach is very loosely chronological, it is not intended as a comprehensive survey of American religions in the United States. Our goal is to explore the relationship between religion and society by considering the interaction of society’s various participants in the shaping of a shared and often deeply contested “American” culture. Beginning with the encounters between native peoples, enslaved Africans and Europeans in the 1600s, we will look at the ways in which individual believers and various groups in the “New World” have defined their religious identities and attempted to manage their relations with one another and the state during periods of colonialism, slavery, migration, industrialization, immigration, and increasing ethnic and religious pluralism.

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Intro, Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies, American Studies

Religious Traditions: Catholic, General Comparative Traditions, Other Traditions, Protestant

Topics: Gender/Women/ Sexuality, Immigration/Refugees, Politics/Law/Government, Popular Culture/Media/Music/Sports, Pluralism/Secularism/Culture Wars, Race/Ethnicity

Keywords:

Religion and Spirituality in American History Syllabus

Vaughn Booker
Author

Dartmouth College
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2020
Date Published

Description:

This First-year Seminar introduces students to American religious history and spirituality by focusing on how humans deal with death and the dead. Encounters with immaterial human subjects in North American history are somewhat distinct from communing and communicating with deities in a religion’s pantheon. They involve religious subjects performing ritual engagement with human beings across time and space—those who have “passed on”—for familial, social, and even political purposes.  Religious uses of the language of ancestors, “mystical persons,” and concepts of martyrdom and “mortuary politics” invite reflection on the material impacts of spiritual subjects in this world for various groups.  This course will familiarize students with various “Spiritual” traditions in North American religious history, paying attention to the complex categories and identities of race and gender in living religious subjects as well as the deceased subjects they engage—the dead who “talk back.”

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Intro, Seminar

Discipline: Religious Studies

Religious Traditions: Catholic, Indigenous, Judaism, New Religious Movements, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords: death, mourning, memorialization, martyrdom, mortuary politics, spiritualism, new religious movements, activism

Religion and the City

Courtney Bender
Author

Columbia University
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2006
Date Published

Description:

This semester we will investigate the ways that practical concerns of daily living in the city as well as fears, desires, and nostalgia shape religion in the city. We begin by addressing how religious groups and institutions shape neighborhoods or districts, and analyze the contributions of religious institutions, histories and theologies to these urban regions. We will then address the ways that religious communities interact with each other as they share space or contest the boundaries of neighborhoods, analyzing how religious groups can foster both civic participation and social violence and disruption. Next, we will consider the various public settings wherein religious language, practice, and performance take place. We will then turn to the ways that religions in the city are shaped by new patterns of migration and globalization. Finally, we turn to focus specifically on the ways that “the city” is imagined, “read” and remembered through religious memory and social action.

 

This syllabus was created for the Young Scholars in American Religion program.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions, Islam

Topics: Immigration/Refugees, Race/Ethnicity, Region/Urban/Rural

Keywords:

Religion and the Civil Rights Movement Syllabus

Vaughn Booker
Author

Dartmouth College
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2020
Date Published

Description:

This course presents the centrality of religious activists, organizations, institutions, intellectuals, clergy, and laypeople to the work of civil rights activism in twentieth-century United States history.  Students will explore the theologies of African American Protestants, liberal religious thinkers, and adherents to Gandhian nonviolence that allowed many to wage nonviolent struggle against racial segregation, violence, and disfranchisement in American politics and society.  In-class discussions and exercises will allow students to engage the religious sermons, speeches, memoirs, music, and visual protest strategies of movement activists as they risked their lives pursuing a nonviolent end to America’s violent Jim Crow reality.Units I and II focus on the historical backdrop and theological foundations of civil rights work for twentieth-century religious activists.  Unit III shifts the course focus to the mid-century period of civil rights activism, 1955-1968.  The term concludes with reflection on the legacies of religious activism for civil rights causes.

Institution Type: Private College or University

Class Type: Undergraduate Course

Discipline: Religious Studies

Religious Traditions: Islam, Judaism, Other Christianities, Protestant

Topics:

Keywords: Pauli Murray, Martin Luther King, Fannie Lou Hamer, Bayard Rustin, Malcolm X, civil rights, religious activism, religious liberalism, liberal Christianity, nonviolence, African American religion

Religion and the Family

The Association of Religion Data Archives
Author

IUPUI
Institution

Assignment
Resource Type

2020
Date Published

Description:

The ARDA Lesson Plans integrate content from the ARDA and other sources into teachable units. Each lesson has specific learning objectives, a host of relevant readings from which to choose, learning activities to utilize in class, and assessment tools to gauge students learning on the topic. Lesson plans contain links to the ARDA learning resources to make it easy for educators to use the ARDA in their teaching. The lessons are designed for courses in a wide range of disciplines, including history, political science, psychology, religious studies, and sociology. This assignment was created for the Association of Religion Data Archives.

Institution Type: Community College, Public College or University, Private College or University, Seminary

Class Type: Intro, Undergraduate Course, Graduate Course, Online, Seminar

Discipline: Religious Studies, Sociology

Religious Traditions: General Comparative Traditions

Topics: Class/Power, Family/Children/Reproduction, Gender/Women/ Sexuality

Keywords: family, religion, cultural, sociology, research

Religion and the Paranormal

The Association of Religion Data Archives
Author

IUPUI
Institution

Assignment
Resource Type

2020
Date Published

Description:

The ARDA Lesson Plans integrate content from the ARDA and other sources into teachable units. Each lesson has specific learning objectives, a host of relevant readings from which to choose, learning activities to utilize in class, and assessment tools to gauge students learning on the topic. Lesson plans contain links to the ARDA learning resources to make it easy for educators to use the ARDA in their teaching. The lessons are designed for courses in a wide range of disciplines, including history, political science, psychology, religious studies, and sociology. This assignment was created for the Association of Religion Data Archives.

Institution Type: Community College, Public College or University, Private College or University, Seminary

Class Type: Intro, Undergraduate Course, Graduate Course, Online, Seminar

Discipline: Religious Studies, Sociology

Religious Traditions: New Religious Movements

Topics: He​alth/Death, Popular Culture/Media/Music/Sports, Science/Technology/Environment

Keywords: paranormal, religion, sociology, United States

Religion in America

Matthew J. Cressler
Author

College of Charleston
Institution

Syllabus
Resource Type

2019
Date Published

Description:

Is the United States a Christian nation or the most religious diverse country in the world? Does the story of religion in America begin in 1492, 1619, or 1776? What does “religious freedom” mean in society built on slavery and settler colonialism? And why do these questions matter? Students will engage each of these questions and more as they are introduced to religion in the 4 Americas broadly and in the United States in particular. The course will situate religion in America in its historical and cultural context. It will also unearths our assumptions about what “religion” and “America” are in the first place. In addition, students will debate contemporary issues at the intersection of religion, race, and politics in America. Topics explored include the convergence of Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans in the context of Christian empires; Jews, Catholics, and African Americans negotiating religious freedom in the nascent U.S. nation; as well as the ways Asian, African, and American im/migrants changed the religious